Archive for Medicine

Ebola Ain’t No Thang

What, me worry?

Ron Klain, the man appointed by President Barack Obama on Friday to head up the government’s response to the Ebola virus in the United States, will not clock in on his new job until Wednesday.

White House Deputy Press Secretary Eric Schultz told reporters in Chicago on Monday that it isn’t unusual for it to take weeks or months for an appointee to complete the “onboarding process,” The Washington Examiner reports.

“It is not that long of a lapse,” Schultz said.

No, of course not. Ebola must be scared [bleepless], if you’ll pardon the pun, by this guy’s dogged determinism.

Press reports already have noted Klain missing two meetings with the president on Ebola since his appointment was announced. And he won’t testify on Friday before a Republican-led House hearing, because, Schultz said, “That will be day three of his tenure.”

Can’t he appear and just take the 5th, like Lois Lerner?

I just hope Ebola does the sporting thing and gives Klain the chance to set up his desk: fill his stapler, open his desk calendar to the correct date, get the right mix of coffee and Cremora. No fair infecting more nurses, Ebola! (Though Ebola has good taste; they’re cute!)

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Congratulations Nigeria!

We’re used to losing to Africans in marathons, but we thought we had them beat in medicine.

I blame our “coach”:

Nigeria has been declared officially free of Ebola after six weeks with no new cases, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.

WHO representative Rui Gama Vaz, speaking in the capital Abuja, said it was a “spectacular success story”.

Nigeria won praise for its swift response after a Liberian diplomat brought the disease there in July.

The outbreak has killed more than 4,500 people in West Africa, mostly in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

An estimated 70% of those infected have died in those countries.

The WHO officially declared Senegal Ebola-free on Friday.

Senegal? Senegal’s medical system bested ours? Words fail me…

The WHO can declare an Ebola outbreak over if two incubation periods of 21 days pass with no new cases. The last reported case in Nigeria – Africa’s most populous country – was discovered on 5 September.

The BBC’s Will Ross in Lagos says the nightmare scenario of Ebola spreading through Nigeria’s 170 million people has been avoided and the nation is heaving a collective sigh of relief.

I would have bet (someone else’s) money that once Ebola hit Lagos, it was goodnight Nigeria.

How’d they do it?

Officials credit tighter border controls, good patient-tracking and other medical practices, and just plain luck with keeping Ebola confined mostly to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea since the outbreak was first identified nearly seven months ago.

Senegal did so well in finding and isolating a man with Ebola who had slipped across the border from Guinea in August that the World Health Organization on Friday will declare the end of the disease in Senegal if no new cases surface.

Nigeria is another success story. It had 20 cases and eight deaths after the virus was brought by a Liberian-American who flew from Liberia to Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital of 21 million people, in July. Nearly 900 people were potentially exposed to the virus by the traveler, who died, and the disease could have wreaked havoc in Africa’s most populous nation.

Border closings may also be helping halt the spread of Ebola.

Ivory Coast, Guinea-Bissau and Senegal, all of which share borders with at least one of the three most affected countries, have closed those borders.

Nigeria initially banned flights from countries with Ebola but relaxed the restriction once it felt that airlines were competent to take travelers’ temperatures and follow other measures to prevent people with Ebola from flying.

Nigeria has teams taking the temperature of travelers at airports and seaports.

Another factor is luck. All it takes is one infected person to slip around guards at a border post or get aboard a plane.

“God has been merciful we haven’t reported a case in Kenya, but we really need to up our disaster preparedness,” said Dr. Nelly Bosire, an official with Kenya’s main medical union.

“The fact we stopped doing the West African flights had an impact. On that part I think we got it right. But it still has more to do with luck.”

Luck is the residue of design, the saying goes. Meanwhile, we still haven’t cleaned up the residue where Thomas Eric Duncan hurled.

But we’ll get there! Look out, Senegal, we’re right behind ya!

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“Street Anger” and “Agitation” Watch

I sense a new theme, don’t you, John Kerry?

The daughter of the leader of Gaza’s Hamas terror militia, Ismail Haniyeh, received emergency medical treatment in an Israeli hospital in Tel Aviv earlier this month, according to Reuters news agency.

Ichilov Hospital confirmed the report and said that the daughter had been released over a week ago.

“Ismail Haniyeh’s daughter was indeed hospitalized for medical treatment for several days at the hospital,” Ichilov said. “Over 1,000 patients from Gaza and the Palestinian Authority territories – both adults and children – are hospitalized for treatment at our hospital every year.”

Several of Haniyeh’s relatives have received medical treatment in Israel, including his mother in-law and granddaughter, despite the fact that he has pledged Israel’s utter destruction.

Fine, go to Israel for treatment if you must.

But don’t drink the water!

Last month, official PA TV revived another medieval libel reporting as news that Israel was intentionally “injecting poison” into Palestinian water sources as a “war strategy” during the recent Gaza war:

Official PA TV newsreader: “Water experts have warned of the consequences of the attack by the occupation [Israel] on water wells, as a result of its use of poisonous bombs that threaten public health…”

Official PA TV reporter: “The policy of attacking water wells is a war strategy used by the occupation in its aggression against Gaza. Not only were the people deprived of water, but poison was also injected into main [water] sources, destroying agriculture.” [Official PA TV, Sept. 24, 2014]

That’s enough to make the quietest street angry! And you don’t know from agita.

PS: While we’re on the subject of blood libel, I hope the Israelis siphoned off a pint or two. A matzo isn’t matzo without that special ingredient!

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Coming to America

You don’t need a brain as big as this guy’s to know that travel from West Africa is a bad idea right now—but as long as he has one anyway:

[A]ccording to the head of a research institute in Cambridge, the new restrictions might still not go far enough.

Yaneer Bar-Yam leads the New England Complex Systems Institute, and for years he’s been arguing that in cases of severe infectious disease outbreaks, the best policy might be to prohibit travel from afflicted countries altogether.

“At the global level, I do think transportation should be curtailed from, but not to, West Africa,” he says.

Bar-Yam is trained as a physicist. His research primarily focuses on the behavior of complex systems, like, for example, the way an infectious disease moves through a population. In 2006 he coauthored a paper with Erik Rauch, a computer scientist at MIT, called “Long-range interactions and evolutionary stability in a predator-prey system.” The title is a mouthful, but the paper’s implications for the current Ebola outbreak are stark. Bar-Yam and Rauch used mathematical models to simulate the spread of an infectious disease; their analysis suggests that even small amounts of travel between regional populations may be enough to allow an infectious disease to jump from one country to another. “Even if significant mixing already exists,” the authors write, “a small amount of additional mixing may cause extinction.” And in this case, extinction means us.

And we all know how liberals love models. Sounds like “settled science” to me.

“Severe pathogens . . . can be stopped by the very fact that they’re destructive,” he says. “If they kill off their host, whatever’s going to happen is going to happen locally.” In other words, epidemics burn out on their own when the disease has no one left to infect, provided they’re not able to hop across oceans on airplanes.

One of the biggest arguments against travel restrictions is the sense that our health care system can handle isolated Ebola cases as they crop up here. Bar-Yam thinks that confidence is misplaced, a view which has gained some currency as it’s emerged that a Dallas hospital misdiagnosed and released Duncan when he first showed up for treatment.

Doctors trace the severity of an outbreak by the average number of people become ill after contact with an infected person. If the number is one or less, the outbreak is stable or declining. If it’s greater than one, it’s spreading. Thomas Eric Duncan infected two people (that we know of), trained nurses, in a “health care system can handle isolated Ebola cases as they crop up here”.

If you weren’t soiling your drawers before, now’s a good time to start. If you were, you should get checked out. It’s a symptom.

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Ebola Follies

All hemorrhagic fever all the time:

U.S. standards for protecting healthcare workers from Ebola are weaker than those widely used in West Africa, according to the leader of a group treating victims of the virus in Liberia.

“We’re not comfortable with [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)] procedures,” Ken Isaacs, the vice president of Samaritan’s Purse, told The Hill.

When Samaritan’s Purse health workers treat patients in Liberia, they wear two pairs of gloves and spray themselves with disinfectant twice before leaving the isolation ward. They have a three-foot “no touch” policy and hold safety meetings every day.

In U.S. hospitals — such as Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, which has had three cases of Ebola — workers don’t have to hose down their gear and are told it’s OK for gloves to expose their wrists.

“If you slip, and you touch your skin on the wrist, you’re going to get Ebola,” said Isaacs, who has worked on-the-ground disaster relief in countries like Haiti, the Philippines and Bosnia.

“Can we trust CDC? They said they were going to stop it in its tracks, but I don’t know.”

The nurses don’t trust the CDC:

National Nurses United, the country’s largest nurses union, has unleashed fierce criticism of the hospital this week, alleging that the disease spread because of incompetent management and poor training.

Brianna Aguirre, a nurse at the Dallas hospital, told NBC’s “Today Show” on Thursday that she has watched people at her hospital “violate basic principles of nursing care and medical care.”

She said her garb left parts of her neck exposed, and some nurses would use tape to cover the area. She added that potentially exposed nurses would go into other patients’ rooms without disinfectants.

The CDC raised its standards for protective gear this week to include garb that does not expose a worker’s neck. It also added “an enhanced and detailed step-by-step disinfection of hands.”

But as good Dr. Frieden said yesterday, you can get Ebola, but you can’t give it.

In further developments:

On Monday, a CDC official cleared Vinson to fly from Cleveland to Dallas on board Frontier Airlines Flight 1143 despite the fact that she had called and reported having a slight fever, one of the common symptoms of the Ebola virus. Vinson’s reported temperature — 99.5 degrees — was below the threshold of 100.4 degrees set by the agency and she had no symptoms, according to CDC spokesman David Daigle.

Federal sources, though, are now saying she “lied” about how she was feeling. Though she told the CDC she had a low-grade fever, according to sources her family said she was feeling tired and not feeling well. But sources said this information was not conveyed to CDC officials when she called to ask about flying.

She called the CDC, reported her symptoms, and abided by their advice. She had tended a dying Ebola patient. And they’re calling her a liar?

Did it not occur to the bozos that 99.5 could be just a transitional temperature on the way to their beloved 100.4? Who checks their temperature anyway unless they’re not feeling well? She reported herself ill—after working with an Ebola patient—and they let her fly.

You almost have to laugh. I do, but it’s getting harder.

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Ebola Follies

I’m no doctor, no public health official, but these imbeciles make know-nothing criticism so easy anyone can do it.

Join me, it’s fun!

As news helicopters swarmed over Dallas’ Love Field this evening to watch the second U.S. nurse to contract Ebola board a private plane bound for Atlanta, one lone mysterious man stood out from the pack.

Holding a clipboard and directing the transfer, the unidentified man seemed to be the only person on the tarmac without protective clothing, wearing just a button down shirt and trousers.

While Ebola is not an airborne disease, his presence so close to patient Amber Vinson’s medical team sparked fears after he was seen grabbing a container and hazmat trash bag from one of the workers’ in full-protective gear and later boarding the flight.

It is believed he flew with Vinson and the other hazmat-suited medical staff to Atlanta and local television crews spotted him with the stricken nurse as she disembarked at the airport in Georgia to be transferred to Emory University Hospital.

When the plane landed in Atlanta, the man had still not donned any protective clothing and was seen openly interacting with Vinson and the other medical professionals caring for the nurse.

This would be Nurse Vinson’s third flight while infected, by the way:

The second Dallas nurse to contract Ebola after treating U.S. ‘patient zero’ Thomas Eric Duncan received permission from the CDC to get on a commercial flight with a low-grade fever on Monday.

Miss Vinson was one of the nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to treat Duncan when he was admitted a second time on September 28, in the first ‘high-risk’ days.

But on October 10, Miss Vinson left the Dallas area to plan her upcoming wedding in Cleveland, Ohio. Before her return flight on Monday, the nurse noticed a spike in her temperature and called the CDC several times to see if she should get on the plane.

When she finally got through to a CDC representative, she was cleared since her 99.5F fever was beneath the 100.4 threshold.

CDC Director Dr Thomas Frieden admits that was the wrong call.

‘Those who have exposures to Ebola, she should not have traveled on a commercial airline,’ Dr Frieden said Wednesday. ‘The CDC guidance in this setting outlines the need for controlled movement. That can include a charter plane; that can include a car; but it does not include public transport. We will from this moment forward ensure that no other individual who is being monitored for exposure undergoes travel in any way other than controlled movement.’

Wait a minute, doc. You have some ‘splainin’ to do too:

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said during a telephone press briefing Wednesday that you cannot get Ebola by sitting next to someone on a bus, but that infected or exposed persons should not ride public transportation because they could transmit the disease to someone else.

“I think there are two different parts of that equation,” he continued. “The first is, if you’re a member of the traveling public and are healthy, should you be worried that you might have gotten it by sitting next to someone? And the answer is no.”

“Second, if you are sick and you may have Ebola, should you get on a bus? And the answer to that is also no. You might become ill, you might have a problem that exposes someone around you,” he said.

I title this series Ebola Follies because it resembles a goofy stage farce. But it keeps getting funnier. I see this show running for years.

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Ebola Follies

Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind: [A few additional thoughts to Aggie's similar post below]

A second Texas nurse who has contracted Ebola flew on a commercial flight from Ohio to Dallas with a slight temperature the day before she was diagnosed, health officials said on Wednesday, raising new concerns about U.S. efforts to control the disease.

Chances that other passengers on the plane were infected were very low, but the nurse should not have been traveling on the flight, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Thomas Frieden told reporters.

The woman, Amber Vinson, 29, was isolated immediately after reporting a fever on Tuesday, Texas Department of State Health Services officials said. She had treated Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola and was the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States.

As Aggie reported earlier, Obama canceled a fundraising junket so as to appear to be involved (if not interested) in the effort to stave of an epidemic. No wonder stocks tanked (see below). If he cancels golf this weekend, move to New Zealand as soon as you can.

Frieden said Vinson had been monitoring herself for symptoms of Ebola and failed to report that her temperature had risen to 99.5 degrees before she departed for Dallas. Even so, Frieden said the risk to other passengers was “very low” because she did not vomit on the flight and was not bleeding.

He added that authorities had identified three people who had direct contact with her before she was isolated.

Dr. Mary DiOrio, interim chief of the Ohio Department of Health’s Division of Prevention and Health Promotion, told reporters Vinson visited family in Akron from Oct. 8 to Oct. 13 before she flew to Dallas on Frontier.

Lovely young woman, I’m sure. Doing God’s work. Of course she should not have taken the flight; of course she should have reported herself a week ago. But she did, and she didn’t. People do s**t like that all the time, sometimes with consequences, sometimes without.

I just love (as in hate) the fact that the CDC declares that an American citizen should not have taken a flight, yet recoils in horror at the suggestion that Liberian nationals from a Hot Zone be denied entry. We are so [bleeped]. Hello, Auckland!

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Hang Down Your Head, Thomas Eric Duncan

Hang down your head and cry.
Another nurse ’bout to die:

A second healthcare worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola.

The worker was among those who cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to die from the deadly virus on U.S. soil.

The unnamed member of staff reported a fever yesterday and were immediately isolated at the hospital, the Texas department of state health services has revealed.

Health officials have interviewed the latest patient to identify any contacts or potential exposures and has said that those people will be monitored.

Mr Duncan arrived in Texas from Liberia on September 20. He began showing symptoms of Ebola three days after his arrival and was admitted to Texas Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday 28. He died on Wednesday October 8.

Three weeks ago, Tom Duncan was just an anonymous Liberian—who had happened to carry a dying, communicable Ebola patient—seeking a better life in America. Today, he is Patient Zero in an outbreak that threatens to collapse the entire American health care system. That’s not my hyperbole. That’s public health officials. I’ll leave it to the geekier of our readers to do the math of how many people could Duncan and the 70 health care workers have infected in the time he was here. Two so far, but two is infinitely more than we were told was possible. Who believes anything the CDC says?

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Throwing Feces Against the Wall

Some on the Left have tried to blame the Ebola outbreak on dastardly and merciless budget cuts from Republicans.

Bad move:

The $30 billion U.S. National Institutes of Health blamed tightening federal budgets on Monday for its inability to produce an Ebola vaccine, but a review of its grant-making history in the last 10 years has turned up highly unusual research that redirected precious funds away from more conventional public health projects.

The projects included $2.4 million to develop ‘origami’ condoms designed with Japanese folding paper in mind, and $939,000 to find out that male fruit flies prefer to romance younger females because the girl-flies’ hormone levels drop over time.

Other winners of NIH grants consumed $325,000 to learn that marriages are happier when wives calm down more quickly during arguments with their husbands, and $257,000 to make an online game as a companion to first lady Michelle Obama’s White House garden.

The agency also spent $117,000 in taxpayers’ grant dollars to discover that most chimpanzees are right-handed.

The same group of scientists determined, at a cost of $592,000 for NIH, that chimps with the best poop-throwing skills are also the best communicators. But while flinging feces might get another primate’s attention in the wild, they discovered, it’s not much good in captivity.

‘I’ve never in my life seen a chimp be given a banana for throwing s**t at someone,’ Emory University psychologist Bill Hopkins told Wired magazine.

I so want to drop a comment in here, but it would be construed as racist. So let me say instead that Biden has been throwing s**t at us for nearly six years.

But back to the facts:

Untitled

The Washington Free Beacon reported in May that Origami Condom creator Daniel Resnic was accused of spending NIH grant money on an Amsterdam junket, a Cadillac and a party at the Playboy Mansion.

He also is under investigation for flouting research protocols by designating his friends as test subjects and asking them to report back after they tested the product.

Paper cuts?

And $832,000 went to learn if it was possible to get uncircumcised South African tribesmen into the habit of washing their genitals after having sex.

‘If we find that men are able to practice consistent washing practices after sex,’ researchers at Penn State University told the NIH, ‘we will plan to test whether this might protect men from becoming HIV infected in a later study.’

Oh, okay then.

That’s the NIH dealt with. How about the CDC?

Consider the Prevention and Public Health Fund, a new series of annual mandatory appropriations created by Obamacare. Over the past five years, the CDC has received just under $3 billion in transfers from the fund. Yet only 6 percent—$180 million—of that $3 billion went toward building epidemiology and laboratory capacity. Especially given the agency’s postwar roots as the Communicable Disease Center, one would think that “detecting and responding to infectious diseases and other public health threats” warrants a larger funding commitment.

Instead, the Obama administration has focused the CDC on other priorities. While protecting Americans from infectious diseases received only $180 million from the Prevention Fund, the community transformation grant program received nearly three times as much money—$517.3 million over the same five-year period.

The CDC’s website makes clear the objectives of community transformation grants. The program funds neighborhood interventions like “increasing access to healthy foods by supporting local farmers and developing neighborhood grocery stores,” or “promoting improvements in sidewalks and street lighting to make it safe and easy for people to walk and ride bikes.” Bike lanes and farmer’s markets may indeed help a community—but they would do little to combat dangerous diseases like Ebola, SARS or anthrax.

Lastly:

The DCCC unveiled advertising declaring “Republicans voted to cut CDC’s budget to fight Ebola. Republicans protect tax breaks for special interests.”

In January, that allegedly miserly and cruel and callous GOP-controlled House also approved a budget that increased CDC’s budget by a lot:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will see an 8.2 percent budget increase for fiscal 2014, thanks to a $1.1 trillion spending bill announced by Congress Jan. 13.

This influx of cash will raise the CDC budget to $6.9 billion, which is $567 million more than it received in 2013. This is more than the agency anticipated, because the president’s fiscal year 2014 budget request for it was just $6.6 billion — a decrease of $270 million from fiscal 2012.

So, there was an effort to cut the CDC budget: BY OBAMA. Thank God the Republicans in the House fended off his “draconian” cuts.

Thank, Libs. Any other s**t you’d like to throw against a wall?

Which gives me an idea:

If the NIH was really so concerned about developing an Ebola vaccine, for example, it could have directed more grant money to that effort, rather than wasting it researching such things as diseases among male sex workers in Peru ($400,000), why chimps throw feces ($600,000) and sexual attraction among fruit flies (nearly $1 million).

Imagine the savings if you combined the reports by studying diseased Peruvian sex workers throwing monkey feces at fruit flies?

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Ebola Follies

Precautions, shmecautions:

A health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who provided care for the Ebola patient who was hospitalized and later died there has tested positive for the disease in a preliminary test at the state public health laboratory in Austin. Confirmatory testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, according to state officials.

The health care worker reported a low grade fever Friday night and was isolated and referred for testing. The preliminary test result was received late Saturday.

“We knew a second case could be a reality, and we’ve been preparing for this possibility,” said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. “We are broadening our team in Dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread.”

You might want to step up those efforts to extremer diligence, doc. Maybe wicked extreme, if you can manage it. Merely extreme diligence isn’t getting it done.

Duncan, 42, died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where he was admitted Sept. 28 and kept in isolation, according to spokesman Wendell Watson. Wendell said the death left officials with “profound sadness and heartfelt disappointment.”

Bullsh*t. Some nurse who’s probably never been to West Texas, let alone West Africa, now has one of the world’s most deadly diseases because this criminal from Liberia (even his president said so) risked the lives of hundreds of people to get here and enjoy half a million dollars of the best medical care in the world (for however much longer we can make that claim), at no cost to himself, even though he was a dead man walking by the time he got here. Excuse the length of the preceding sentence, but the more I think about what he did—about what we allowed him to do—the more I want to throttle somebody (while wearing a Level 4 hazmat suit). Smart people—scientists, not “public health” officials—know we can’t allow any possible transmission of this plague beyond where it’s already endemic. The only people who argue otherwise are politicians and bureaucrats. They’d rather see an epidemic than violate the tenets of political correctness.

Tomorrow is Columbus Day in America. Yet today it is more fashionable to describe history’s most famous explorer as a genocidal racist than as Italy’s favorite son. Columbus and the other European explorers are trashed for unknowingly exposing indigenous peoples here to all manner of European plagues to which they had immunity: smallpox, measles, hemorrhoids, whatever. Thomas Eric Duncan may not have been symptomatic when he bought his ticket and boarded the plane, but he knew well he might soon be. I don’t feel “profound sadness and heartfelt disappointment” at his inevitable death. I feel [bleeping] pissed. My sadness and disappointment are reserved for the infected health care worker who showed him kindness and mercy.

No good deed…

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From the Good Folks Who Brought You the “Settled Science” of Global Warming

Their latest creation: free travel to and from plague-infested countries!

[I]n an exclusive Arutz Sheva e-mail interview, Dr. David Dausey, a world-recognized infectious disease expert, asserted that the scientific-sounding pronouncements like those issued by the UN Secretary-General and the WHO against a travel ban “don’t hold up to scrutiny.” Last week, Dr. Dausey authored a pro-travel-ban op-ed in the Washington Post entitled “Stop the Flights Now.”

Dr. Dausey is a Yale and Harvard-educated epidemiologist recognized worldwide for his research on infectious diseases. He is currently the Dean of the School of Health Professions and Public Health and Chair and Professor of the Public Health Department at Mercyhurst University.

Specifically, Dr. Dausey is an expert in planning for global pandemic emergencies such as influenza. When asked by e-mail, “Do you know of any ‘risk of transmission’ analysis [relating to the West African Ebola contagion] that would support an ‘anti-travel ban’ stance?,” Dr. Dausey answered:

“You are asking the right questions! There aren’t any risk assessments. Everything is based in arguments that aren’t really proven. I’m shocked that more reporters aren’t asking these kinds of questions. When you start to evaluate the arguments for not having a travel ban [to Ebola-stricken West Africa] you will find that they don’t hold up to scrutiny.”

In fact, a closer analysis of many explicit warnings cataloged in the same WHO Risk Assessment that the UN Secretary General relied on to issue his anti-travel-ban stance, appears to scientifically support Dr. Dausey’s call for a US travel ban to the West African countries affected by Ebola.

From Arutz Sheva’s review of the WHO Risk Assessment, here are just some of the problematic questions that arise:

Given the wildly variable incubation period of “2 to 21 days,” during which the infected person is “not infectious” to other people, how does a traveler even know they are “infected”? What of the danger of a knowingly infected person travelling to the United States wanting to lie about his condition, in order to seek better treatment in the United States?

With the airplane seats being likely repositories of undetectable highly infectious Ebola-infected materials, how can the airlines effectively clean the seats when the WHO recommends “non-cleanable fabric [seats] should be removed before the plane is used again”?

“Application of disinfectants should be preceded by cleaning to prevent inactivation of disinfectants by organic matter” – again, what if the organic matter is not clearly visible to the airline staff? How can this be practically applied?

In conclusion, Dr. Dausey remarked, “The reality is that a temporary ban could be feasible. British Airways and Air France already stopped their flights.” Based on the text of WHO Risk Assessment that the Secretary General of the United Nations relies on, a travel ban isn’t just “feasible,” but may be necessary.

This sounds a lot more rational and scientific than the guy who said we had to accept sick Liberians because that nation was settled (almost 200 years ago) by freed American slaves. To me, anyway.

And I’m not saying no aid or aid workers can come or go (with proper precautions). Just no Ebola tourism. How hard is this to understand?

PS: And note how astonished the guy is that reporters are just taking the pronouncements of bureaucrats as gospel like the dumb sheep they are. You and me both, doc. Except me.

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Ebola Follies

Oh, my aching sides!

Wait, is that a symptom?

CNN host Erin Burnett asks guest Dr. Alexander van Tulleken whether the government is holding a secret stash of the experimental Ebola medicine Z-Mapp to be used “if Obama had Ebola,” and whether or not the medicine could have saved the life of Ebola patient Michael [sic] Eric Duncan. Van Tulleken “doesn’t think they’re holding any” of the medicine “in reserve for [Obama] or anyone else.”

Sorry, Erin, but you just set dumb broads back at least six decades. Everybody knows Obama could just cure himself. Besides, we sent all our Z-Mapp to Africa—and when I say “we” and “our”, I mean in the royal sense. I didn’t invent anything. (Except BTL.com—you’re welcome!)

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