Archive for Liberal Fascism

Deriving Their Just Power From the Consent of the Governed

What is the role of government?

Is it this?

The Vermont House has endorsed a measure to ban so-called microbeads from personal-care products sold in the state. The tiny plastic particles are used to make some soaps, toothpastes, and over-the-counter drugs more abrasive. But environmentalists said they pose a threat to water quality, marine life, and possibly to human health. Microbeads are blamed for attracting and becoming a vehicle for toxic chemicals in water. One concern is that they then can be eaten by fish that are later eaten by humans. A bill given preliminary approval Tuesday would ban the sale of personal-care products containing microbeads beginning at the end of 2018, and in over-the-counter drugs in late 2019.

Or this?

Vermont lawmakers are considering whether to become the first state Legislature to legalize marijuana.

Or even this?

A political showdown is developing at the Vermont Statehouse over a gun control bill. The governor doesn’t support it.

Or how about this from Vermont West?

Seattle began enforcing this month a new law, which aims to curb the amount of food sent to landfills. As of January 1, residents of the city, including all commercial establishments, must have a composting service haul away their food waste, drive the waste to a processing site, or compost it themselves at home or on-site. The law applies not only to food but also any cardboard or paper with food on it.

For those unwilling to cooperate, there will be a price.

For now, the cost of defiance will come in the form of public shaming. Those who refuse to separate their garbage will find their bins tagged with a red sign for all to see. The hope is that the tags will help serve as both a warning as well as an incentive to make composting a habit. But come June, after a public education campaign lasting several months about the new rules, violators will begin facing fines—$1 per infraction for households; and $50 per breach by apartment buildings and businesses.

That’s a bit of a walkabout from life, liberty, and the pursuit of #2 plastics.

But I’m torn. The more local the government, the more it represents the will of the people it governs. But as these cases clearly show, local government represents the will—the tyrannical will—of the majority of the people it governs. The minority can get [bleeped].

Think I’m wrong?

Seattle’s new law is meant to help the city achieve its goal to recycle 60 percent of waste by the end of this year. Strict rules, which have banned recyclables from trash bins since 2005, have helped Seattle come within striking distance of that promise—the city currently recycles approximately 56 percent of its waste. But progress toward that goal appears to have stalled; the percentage has barely increased in recent years, and even fell in residential homes between 2012 and 2013, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting.

You don’t get in much more Marxist marching formation than in Seattle. And they still can’t reach that Utopia of universal recycling and unanimous composting. Even with Maoist public shaming.

I hold nothing against recycling (even after watching Penn & Teller’s vicious beatdown of the program), and nothing for microbeads. But ask anyone who knows me and they’ll answer as one: I hate being told what to do. What I have to do. I have a compost pile because I have a garden. I half-assedly throw kitchen scraps into a bin for mixing in with leaves and other yard waste. (To be honest, I just as often throw the crap into the garbage after marinating in its own supperating juices for a week.) But the moment my community passes an ordinance mandating compost piles, I am going to pour lighter fluid all over mine and set a match to it. They’ll see it from the International Space Station.

Like the old lady here in Concord, Mass who spearheaded the ban on the sale of individual bottles of water. How did the tyranny of this individual benefit the rest of the citizenry? She was portrayed as a Joan of Arc. To me, she was Typhoid Mary, Tokyo Rose, and Axis Sally rolled into one.

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What a Difference Two Days Make!

Obama, January 25th: “We have a profound interest, as I believe every country does, in promoting a core principle, which is: Large countries don’t bully smaller countries.”

Obama today:

A top appointee in President Barack Obama’s 2012 election campaign is now working to defeat Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the upcoming March election.

Jeremy Bird was the national field director for Obama’s 2012 campaign, and he’s now working for an Israel-based group, dubbed V15, an anti-Netanyahu group that is backed by a U.S. -U.K. group titled “One Voice.”

“We are working with OneVoice,” confirmed Lynda Tran, who co-founded Bird’s campaign firm, 270 Strategies.

There’s little or no chance that Bird would work against Netanyahu if Obama didn’t want Netanyahu defeated in the March election.

Spread the word. Let’s make it backfire. Is Israel going to let itself be bullied by a “large country”?

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Je Suis James Earl Ray

As he so often does, James Taranto makes the best case against people like Barack Obama who say “The future must not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam.”

But what can one say about this week’s column by DeWayne Wickham, dean of Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication in Baltimore? Choudary and Wickham make nearly identical arguments. Their columns are titled, respectively, “People Know the Consequences” and “ ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Crosses the Line.” Neither man expressly endorses the terrorists’ actions, but both strongly imply the victims had it coming because they offended their killers’ religious sensibilities.

Call it the assassin’s veto. And there is no principled basis to apply such a doctrine only in cases of Islamic supremacist violence. Martin Luther King and other civil-rights leaders were assassinated by white supremacists angry over the things the victims had said. By Wickham’s logic, that would have justified government censorship of speech in favor of civil rights. If the courts adopted the Wickham doctrine, extremists of all stripes would have a powerful incentive to kill.

Martin Luther King knew he was shouting “fire” in a crowded church, not least because there was a fire, or a bomb.

He also knew that by speaking out, he might not live to see the day about which he dreamed.

Like anybody, I would like to live – a long life; longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land. So I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Who knows how many death threats he received? Who knows how many other black Americans were killed in that lawless century between the Civil War and the Civil Rights era? What Dr. King did know, for sure, was that he was poking a white-robed-and-hooded bear. “I just want to do God’s will. … I’m not fearing any man.”

He may not have feared any particular man, but he would have had plenty to fear from J-School deans like DeWayne Wickham and their ilk in academia and the media. King knew that the possibility of his assassination was a necessary prerequisite for speaking out. Politically correct dimwits like DeWayne would have used it as a reason to censor him.

Yes, you had a dream, Marty, that’s nice. But no one wants to hear about that now. Be a good boy and come down from that mountaintop before anyone gets hurt.

Free speech absolutists (among whom I count myself) claim that censorship is often used against the very people it was meant to protect (anti-pornography laws women “performance artists”). That couldn’t clearer here.

Obama and Kerry tiresomely repeat that we should not hold against all Muslims the acts of a few Muslims (who aren’t really Muslim at all). Agreed (up to a point). But then why the admonition against “slandering the prophet of Islam”? Don’t we have laws and law enforcement to protect us from those very few crazies who would take offense to violent extremes? Should we refrain from going out after dark because of the actions of a very few violent criminals? Or should we live our lives according to the liberties guaranteed in the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence—and expect that the government do one of its enumerated jobs and protect our rights (including the right of self-defense, I would argue)?

I think I know how Dr. King would answer that.

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Folks or Volks?

I was just going to sit down and write about Obama’s cynical use of the word “folks” (five mentions in the SOTU), only to see that Aggie beat me to it. Still, I have a favorite:

I intend to protect a free and open Internet, extend its reach to every classroom, and every community — (applause) — and help folks build the fastest networks so that the next generation of digital innovators and entrepreneurs have the platform to keep reshaping our world.

“Folks” built the internet? I thought Al Gore and Tim Berners-Lee did. They’re not “folks”. Steve Jobs and Bill Gates? Not “folks”. His folk-o-meter malfunctioned.

Oddly enough, folks are not always the little guy who needs a break. Sometimes, folks are just evil:

Now, one year doesn’t make a trend, but this does: 14 of the 15 warmest years on record have all fallen in the first 15 years of this century.

I’ve heard some folks try to dodge the evidence by saying they’re not scientists; that we don’t have enough information to act.

Those folk bastards! Get ‘em!

Another of Obama’s tired tropes is “the time for debate is over”, usually employed when he’s losing the debate. But guess what? Sometimes, the debate shouldn’t be over:

So while some have moved on from the debates over our surveillance programs, I have not.

Ray Bolger couldn’t have played a better straw man. Who’s moved on from the debates over our surveillance programs? And they’re not ours, they’re yours! You, Dumbo-ears, you who’ve been in the White House for six years.

But if you want to know the most fascistic phrase liberals have invented, this guy has a candidate:

The phrase “an idea whose time has come” pops up a lot these days, usually though not always in conjunction with left-leaning or “progressive” policy changes.

“The idea of making community college free,” wrote Gary Stix of the Scientific American about a proposal put forward recently by President Obama, “is one whose time has come.” A social-studies teacher last month told Los Angeles Times columnist Sandy Banks that the introduction of an ethnic-studies requirement in L.A. schools is “an idea whose time has come.” And in a Washington Post article last summer about workplace-flexibility legislation, Joan Lombardi, a child-care expert, told the paper that, yes, “It’s an idea whose time has come.”

The line works well on the campaign trail—it lends a bit of intellectual frisson to stump-speech rhetoric—but you shouldn’t take it too far. President Obama, at a Labor Day rally in 2014, told the crowd: “There’s only one thing more powerful than an idea whose time has come.” And what would that be? “Millions of people organizing around an idea whose time has come.” That makes no sense at all.

You mean…it’s inarticulate? [Gasp!]

There is something else that rankles about the phrase. It’s that whiff of arrogance you always get from the rhetoric of inevitability. Those who use it claim to win the argument without having worked for it; they appeal to fate, which for some unstated reason is on their side. If you think their ideas are naïve or half-baked, that’s because you haven’t come to terms with reality. (Or are “on the wrong side of history,” as the president likes to say.) Of course, lots of terrible ideas once had their times come, too, and they were all promoted with the rhetoric of inevitability: communism, socialism, eugenics, racial hegemony of various kinds.

So, true enough: One does not resist the invasion of ideas. But surely one can resist the invasion of an insidious cliché.

It is the nature of politicians to try to peddle snake oil. So, Obama is just another snake oil salesman. But to have so many members of the media wearing sandwich boards out front, promoting the guy—remember, Oz (the great and powerful) was just a flim-flam man:


The time for debate is over. A twister is an idea whose time has come.

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The Courage of His Convictions

How can we defend your freedom of speech, Jim Clancy, when you won’t defend it yourself?

Senior CNN international correspondent Jim Clancy appears to have deleted his Twitter account following a firestorm over a bizarre anti-Israel tirade last week.

Following the murder of 12 people at the Paris headquarters of the Charlie Hebdo magazine, Clancy got into an argument over whether the magazine has actually insulted the founder of Islam Mohammed in its famously provocative cartoons.

But the discussion rapidly deteriorated when Clancy launched a barrage of verbal abuse at several Jewish respondents, attacking them as “pro-Israeli” and accusing some of attempting to promulgate “an anti-Muslim and pro-Israel agenda.”

Several of his followers reacted with shock at his response, with some calling into question his objectivity as a journalist who frequently reports from the Middle East.

Clancy remained unrepentant, however, with a slew of tweets attacking “hasbara” (pro-Israel) activists.

He was also criticized by the head of a disability charity, after he tweeted to one of his critics: “@HumanRights2K Get a grip, junior. It’s my Friday night. You and the Hasbara team need to pick on some cripple on the edge of the herd.”

Jay Ruderman, who heads the Ruderman Family Foundation which advocates for greater integration of people suffering with disabilities, demanded an apology from Clancy, but was promptly blocked.

If CNN reporters are not free to taunt Jews and make fun of the disabled, the terrorists will have won.

Branding the “cripple” comment “appalling,” Ruderman asked how “in this day and age a senior anchor at CNN, a world leader in the media, would use a word such as ‘cripple’, which is a derogatory term for people with disabilities.”

“If a news anchor had hurled a racial epithet, CNN’s response undoubtedly would have been swift,” Ruderman said in a statement. “The disability community expects CNN to extend the same sensitivity to people with disabilities as it does to other minority communities.”

Last year, during the infamous “chickens**t” scandal, Ruderman complained to the White House over alleged comments by an unnamed senior official who referred to Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu as “Aspergery.”

How come the Left feels comfortable pushing the boundaries of free speech only against Jews? Why not call Al Sharpton chickens**t (when the epithet fits)? Isn’t Valerie Jarrett “Aspergery”? I’d defend their right to free expression if only they’d have the nuts to express themselves.

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Nice Little Corporation Ya Got Here

Shame if something happened to it:

For more than a decade, corporations have shelled out thousands of dollars in donations and consulting fees to Sharpton’s National Action Network. What they get in return is the reverend’s supposed sway in the black community or, more often, his silence.

“Al Sharpton has enriched himself and NAN for years by threatening companies with bad publicity if they didn’t come to terms with him. Put simply, Sharpton specializes in shakedowns,” said Ken Boehm, chairman of the National Legal & Policy Center, a Virginia-based watchdog group that has produced a book on Sharpton.

And Sharpton, who now boasts a close relationship with Obama and Mayor de Blasio, is in a stronger negotiating position than ever.

“Once Sharpton’s on board, he plays the race card all the way through,” said a source who has worked with the Harlem preacher. “He just keeps asking for more and more money.”

Sharpton raised $1 million for NAN at his 60th birthday bash in October, with donations rolling in from unions and a corporate roster of contributors including AT&T, McDonald’s, Verizon and Walmart.

Companies have long gotten in line to pay Sharpton. Macy’s and Pfizer have forked over thousands to NAN, as have General Motors, American Honda and Chrysler.

NAN had repeatedly and without success asked GM for donations for six years beginning in August 2000, a GM spokesman told The Post. Then, in 2006, Sharpton threatened a boycott of GM over the planned closing of an African-American-owned dealership in The Bronx. He picketed outside GM’s Fifth Avenue headquarters. GM wrote checks to NAN for $5,000 in 2007 and another $5,000 in 2008.

Sharpton targeted American Honda in 2003 for not hiring enough African-Americans in management positions.

“We support those that support us,” Sharpton wrote to the company. “We cannot be silent while African-Americans spend hard-earned dollars with a company that does not hire, promote or do business with us in a statistically significant manner.”

Two months later, car-company leaders met with Sharpton, and Honda began to sponsor NAN’s events. The protests stopped.

As is so typical of Sharpton, he’s not even an original crook.

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Peak Protest?

I’m not the first to complain about the protestors—that would be anyone stuck in traffic, turned away from Christmas celebrations, or otherwise inconvenienced by die-ins and sundry foolish demonstrations.

But I wonder if we all just haven’t had our fill with the hands-up-don’t-shoot-i-can’t-breathe crowd.

Have they not indeed jumped the great white shark?

In what was slated as a peaceful “March to the Arch” by Ferguson demonstrators, more than two dozen people were arrested and pepper spray was used by police. The melee unfolded as protesters tried to storm the St. Louis Metropolitan Police headquarters building.

About seventy-five people marched through the downtown area and eventually went to police headquarters. There, with the building on lockdown, the group took the opportunity to rush an open door. Several people pushed in.

There was quite a bit of pushing and shoving as police tried to clear the demonstrators out, with officers eventually resorting to the use of pepper spray to push the crowd back.

Five people were arrested in the initial scuffle. Police chief Sam Dotson says officers were justified in clearing the group out of the lobby.

“We’re a public building, we’re open. But we’re open for legitimate business. We’re not open for people to come in and push their own agendas and disrupt the business that has to go on here.”

Protesters were critical of police use of pepper spray, many saying things escalated too quickly, with one “live streamer” who had been hit saying it was happening too often.

“This is becoming too commonplace now. I don’t know,” the man told photojournalist Doug Larsen.

Police say all those calls are already in the met, or on the way to being met, and that protesters are now distracting them from other work with repetitious demands.

“The forty or fifty officers that it took to handle the disturbance that was going on outside police headquarters weren’t in our neighborhoods doing the job our citizens have asked them to do,” Chief Dotson said. “That’s a big deal”

As we’ve long noted, Michael Brown very likely never said “hands up don’t shoot”, or if he did, it was some other time when he wasn’t punching a police officer in the head while reaching for his weapon or bull-rushing him while taking bullet after bullet. And while Eric Garner did say “I can’t breathe”, that meant he could, in fact, breathe. He died not of strangulation, but of the resultant stress on his cardiovascular system (already taxed by diabetes, obesity, and asthma) of resisting arrest.

But we tried to be tolerant. We were told the anger was justifiable, even if the causes were not. Police are pigs, you see, even when there’s insufficient evidence to charge them of a crime. Everyone knew a genuine story of police brutality, they swore, even if these stories were bogus.

Stop. I can’t make you, but stop. No more tolerance, no more allowances. To permit any further disruptions would be to treat you like children. Which you are not. “Black lives matter”, you shout. Indeed they do. If you make them matter. Make them matter. “This is what democracy looks like”, you shouted in the video at the police station. No, it’s not. It’s what mobocracy looks like. Anarchy. And it’s over.

PS: Same goes for the police and any “strike” they may be staging. A moratorium on traffic tickets would be welcome. But if you don’t do your job, you should be canned and replaced by someone who will.

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How Can We Miss You When You Won’t Get the F**k Outta Here?

With all due respect, of course, to the retiring (though he’s anything but) Attorney General of the United States:

In an interview with MSNBC’s Joy Reid in a replica of the bus Rosa Parks rode, Attorney General Eric Holder discussed the lack of respect shown by his political opponents and if a white attorney general would receive the same treatment as him.

“I can’t look into the hearts and minds of people who have been, perhaps, my harshest critics,” Holder said. “I think a large part of the criticism is political in nature. Whether there is a racial component or not, you know, I don’t know.”

“Do you feel you’ve been especially disrespected as attorney general?” Reid asked Holder.

“I think it’s unfortunately part of Washington in 2014,” Holder said. “I would hope that my successor would not have to endure some of the thing is did. I say endure only because I think I’ve shown respect where, perhaps, I haven’t been given any.”

Holder said there have been times when he “wanted to just snap back” and “be a lot more aggressive.”

“There are times when I’ve wanted to just snap back,” Attorney General Holder said. “There are occasions when I have. But there have been frequently more times when I’ve wanted to, you know, be a lot more aggressive in the responses that I’ve made.”

Ask John Ashcroft how it felt to be Attorney General, when almost no Democrats supported his initial appointment. Ask Alberto Gonzalez, who also got no love from the Dems, despite being the first Latino AG—indeed the highest Latino in US government to that date (just as Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice had been the first black and female Secys of State respectively). Talk about your war on women, blacks, and Hispanics!

Let’s take a look at a little bit of Eric Holder not snapping back.

“A nation of cowards”:

Though this nation has proudly thought of itself as an ethnic melting pot, in things racial we have always been and continue to be, in too many ways, essentially a nation of cowards.

Ever wonder why, Eric (the Red)?

Fast and Furious:

“I want to be clear: Any instance of so-called ‘gun walking’ is unacceptable,” Holder said of weapons smuggling, later adding: “This operation was flawed in its concept, and flawed in its execution.”

No [bleep], Sherlock.

Myopia:

“You constantly hear about voter fraud … but you don’t see huge amounts of vote fraud out there,’’ Holder said.

J-u-u-u-st enough, I would say:

Attorney General Eric Holder finally got fed up Tuesday with claims that the Justice Department went easy in a voting rights case against members of the New Black Panther Party because they are African American.

“When you compare what people endured in the South in the 60s to try to get the right to vote for African Americans, and to compare what people were subjected to there to what happened in Philadelphia—which was inappropriate, certainly that…to describe it in those terms I think does a great disservice to people who put their lives on the line, who risked all, for my people,” said Holder, who is black.

“To compare that kind of courage, that kind of action, and to say that the Black Panther incident wrong thought it might be somehow is greater in magnitude or is of greater concern to us, historically, I think just flies in the face of history and the facts.”

How about due process:

“The reality is that we will be reading Miranda rights to the corpse of Osama Bin Laden – he will never appear in an American courtroom,” the nation’s chief enforcement officer told a stunned House hearing.

No argument from me. But isn’t that the same kind of talk that got Bush labeled a “cowboy”?

More due process:

President Barack Obama predicted that professed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed will be convicted and executed as Attorney General Eric Holder proclaimed: “Failure is not an option.”

Even if a terror trial suspect were acquitted, Holder said, he would not be released in the United States.

In one of a series of TV interviews during his trip to Asia, Obama said those offended by the legal privileges given to Mohammed by virtue of getting a civilian trial rather than a military tribunal won’t find it “offensive at all when he’s convicted and when the death penalty is applied to him.”

Obama quickly added that he did not mean to suggest he was prejudging the outcome of Mohammed’s trial. “I’m not going to be in that courtroom,” he said. “That’s the job of the prosecutors, the judge and the jury.”

In interviews broadcast on NBC and CNN Wednesday, the president also said that experienced prosecutors in the case who specialize in terrorism have offered assurances that “we’ll convict this person with the evidence they’ve got, going through our system.”

Holder sought to explain his prosecutorial strategy Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee, where lawmakers questioned him along largely partisan lines over his decision last week to send Mohammed and four alleged henchmen from a detention center at Guantanamo Bay to New York to face a civilian federal trial in New York.

Asked what might happen if the suspects are acquitted, Holder replied: “Failure is not an option. These are cases that have to be won. I don’t expect that we will have a contrary result.”

That’s the President of the United States and the Attorney General prejudging (literally) a civilian trial. Saddam Hussein couldn’t have done better. Homosexuals in Iran are more likely to get off. (Wipe that smirk off your face, you know what I mean.)

So, farewell, then, Eric Holder. Good riddance to bad rubbish. When you finally leave, that is.

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Vox Cop [UPDATED][AGAIN]

I’ve been alluding to this in earlier posts, but let’s hear from some of New York’s finest after their cold-blooded execution of two of their own.

Former commissioner, Bernie Kerik:

With the exception of September 11th this takes me back to 1988, we had two officers killed on October 18th, this reminds me of the days back in the ’60s and ’70s when we faced executions of New York City cops. In this circumstance I believe, I personally feel, that Mayor de Blasio, [Al] Sharpton and others like them, they actually have blood on their hands. They encouraged this behavior. They encouraged protests. These so-called peaceful protests that, where people are standing out there saying “kill the cops,” well, I hope they’re happy, because they got what they wanted.

JUDGE JEANINE PIRRO, FOX NEWS: And what you’re referring to, of course, last Saturday’s protest on the Brooklyn Bridge. The so-called peaceful protest where the protestors yelled, “What do we want? dead cops. When do we want it? Now.”

KERIK: We want them now.

PIRRO: And then two New York City police lieutenants assaulted, mayor de blasio comes out and says they were allegedly assaulted. They weren’t allegedly assaulted; they were assaulted.

KERIK: They were assaulted, they were beaten, their radios were taken. It — you know, I’m numb. I am numb, and you have to question whether this man, Mayor de Blasio, can actually lead this city. You have to question that. You have to wonder, how can he lead the city?

Good question:

On FOX News’ Justice with Judge Jeanine, former NYPD detective Bo Dietl called on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to resign after two NYPD officers were shot dead execution style in Brooklyn as they were sitting inside a patrol car.

“If you look online last week gangs were posting on websites about killing cops,” Dietl said to FOX News host Jeanine Pirro. “But this Gardner thing started this whole atmosphere. First of all, the Gardner incident was not a racist thing. There was a black sergeant on the scene. I don’t want to debate that now, but for them to take it and make it a racial thing, that this mayor, and I call the mayor Big Bird de Blasio because that’s exactly what he is.”

“I was at a promotion ceremony yesterday at One Police Plaza and he got two people clapping for him. This guy is a disgrace. He’s divided this country and this punk Sharpton here marching around last week with those demonstrations. ‘What do we want, dead cops?’ Well, they got two dead cops. And you now what? This guy went to Cuba in 1994. He should take his wife, de Blasio and go back to Cuba and live there,” Dietl also said.

Dietl was referring to the honeymoon de Blasio and his wife Chirlane McCray took in 1994 to Cuba, which violated a U.S. travel ban.

“He should resign tomorrow because he can not do the job and my officers are out there. My cops — I went by the [Rockefeller Plaza Christmas] tree. I went by the tree before. These guys are incensed. They’re saying, ‘Bo, keep speaking, please, we freed [sic] a voice. We need a voice,'” Dietl said.

Here’s another voice:

PAT LYNCH, NYC PATROLMEN’S BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT: Today, this police department, this city and our country is in shock and mourning. Starting today, there’s two families of hero police officers that became part of the NYPD family. Every police officer that lined these streets today with sadness in their eyes to show respect as we carried two hero police officers out of this hospital. We will shoulder the burden for these families each and every day for the rest of their lives. Generations of police officers will know their names and hold them close to their hearts and educate our children about the sacrifice they made.

There’s blood on many hands tonight. Those that incited violence on the street under the guise of protests, that tried to tear down what New York City police officers did every day. We tried to warn, it must not go on, it cannot be tolerated. That blood on the hands starts on the steps of City Hall in the office of the mayor.

Starting today, we started the mourning for our brother police officers. They’re heroes, they’re fathers, they’re brothers, they’re children. That’s the men we lost today. So, starting in the next couple of hours and going for a number of days, New York City police officers, through their sadness, will straighten their shoulders, stiffen their backs and mourn for these families. We’ll mourn for our city, and we’ll mourn for our brothers. When these funerals are over, those responsible will be called on the carpet and held accountable. We ask every person in the city to bow their heads tonight and pray for our families, the families of our lost police officers, their families and the family of every police officer on patrol today who’s in danger.

This was a cold-blooded assassination like we haven’t seen before. So, as I said, we’ll straighten our shoulders, we’ll stiffen our backs, and we’ll wipe our tears. But when these funerals are over, we’ll raise our heads, and those that allowed this to go on will be held accountable.

Sometimes, the obvious occurs only after the fact. Cops may be armed and trained, but they are sitting ducks. They wear uniforms and ID badges, they drive in marked cars, they face investigations up the wazoo if they should ever have to draw their gun and fire.

As Ismaaiyl Brinsley demonstrated, you can execute them at your leisure.

Order his t-shirt now!

UPDATE:
Another voice heard, another finger pointed:

Former New York Gov. George Pataki pegged the shootings of two Brooklyn police officers today on the “divisive, anti-cop rhetoric” of Attorney General Eric Holder and New York City mayor Bill DiBlasio.

Pataki, a Republican who is considering a run for president, tweeted:

Sickened by these barbaric acts, which sadly are a predictable outcome of divisive anti-cop rhetoric of #ericholder & #mayordeblasio. #NYPD.

By blaming Holder, Pataki would appear to be stopping just short of pointing the finger at President Obama.

I think we can read between the hashtags.

UPDATE:
America’s mayor:

“We’ve had four months of propaganda starting with the president that everybody should hate the police,” Giuliani said during an appearance on Fox News early Sunday. “The protests are being embraced, the protests are being encouraged. The protests, even the ones that don’t lead to violence, a lot of them lead to violence, all of them lead to a conclusion: The police are bad, the police are racist. That is completely wrong.”

“I think it goes to far to blame the mayor for the murder or to ask for the mayor’s resignation,” Giuliani said.

“I feel bad the mayor,” Giuliani continued. “He must be heartbroken over the loss of two police officers. I can’t believe this is what he wanted. I don’t he’s a bad man in any way.”

But, Giuliani said, de Blasio is “pursuing the wrong policies” and should not have given protesters demonstrating against the police killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown as much leeway.

“I don’t think it goes too far to say the mayor did not properly police the protests,” Giuliani said. “He allowed the protesters to take over the streets. He allowed them to hurt police officers, to commit crimes, and he didn’t arrest them. And when you do that, similar to what happened in Crown Heights, you create a great riot. He should have known better. For that he has to take accountability.”

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¿Cuba Libre?

You tell me:

Here is what the U.S. Agency for International Development, which takes its foreign policy guidance from the White House and the State Department, has to say about Cuba:

Cuba is a totalitarian state which relies on repressive methods to maintain control. Criticism of national leaders or the political system can lead to imprisonment. Members of the security forces harass and physically assault human rights and pro-democracy advocates, dissidents, detainees, and prisoners. The Cuban Government does not allow independent monitoring of prison conditions by international or national human rights groups and continues to refuse access to detainees by international humanitarian organizations (U.S. Department of State Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2011).…

The Cuban Government routinely denies its citizens freedom of association and does not recognize independent associations. The Cuban Constitution prohibits any political organization that is not officially recognized. As a result, grassroots community efforts which operate in a democratic manner are extremely limited (U.S. Department of State Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2011)….

The Cuban Government owns and the Communist Party controls all print and broadcast media outlets. News and information programming is nearly uniform across all outlets, and the law prohibits distribution of printed material from foreign sources considered “counterrevolutionary” or critical of the government. Foreign newspapers or magazines are generally unavailable, and distribution of material with political content, interpreted broadly to include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, is not allowed and can result in harassment and even detention.

The Cuban Government controls nearly all internet access, with the exception of extremely limited facilities, where foreigners and citizens are allowed to buy Internet access cards for use at hotel business centers, where the price of Internet access is beyond the means of most citizens. Authorities review the browsing history of authorized users, review and censor e-mail, employ Internet search filters, and block access to Web sites considered objectionable (U.S. Department of State Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2011).

Under the arrangement Obama has crafted, Cuba is required to do not a damn thing about reforming any of this. In “exchange,” the United States of America gives Cuba full diplomatic recognition. Plus, Obama tells the world’s other despots that a windfall from Uncle Sam could be awaiting them, too, if they abduct American citizens and hold them for ransom.

It’s true that we have diplomatic relations with just about everybody—North Korea being the only notable exception. But Havana doesn’t sound a whole hell of a lot freer. Pyonyang with an extra ration of fried plantains. Beijing with palm trees.

Cuba’s current sugardaddy, Venezuela, is in its own circle of Hell. If there was ever a time to squeeze Cuba for human rights concessions, this was that time. I guess human rights are just another first-world, colonial imposition on the indigenous proletariat of the world, and Obama says [bleep] that noise. Besides, Major League Baseball could do with a few more power pitchers and right-handed bats.

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King Hussein

As the affronts and outrages pile up, it’s hard to remember which affront is the most outrageous.

This one is:

JONATHAN TURLEY, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW PROFESSOR: There is an issue whether the judge reached a bit too far from the case at hand. This really wasn’t a direct challenge to the immigration action taken by the president but it is scathing and the judge is touching on many complaints that have been raised in other lawsuits that do directly challenge these actions.

What’s a serious question here is the president’s decision to go it alone, not just in this area but other areas. We don’t have a license to go it alone in the United States. The scope of this type of action is legislative. It’s huge. It affects millions. But more importantly, it requires both the federal and state government to spend a great deal of money to support something that didn’t go through the legislative branch. And what people miss, and I think what this judge is trying to establish, is that that process of legislation is the very touch stone of our system, it’s what brings stability to our system. We have to agree, we have to compromise with legislation. When a president does it unilaterally, it takes that whole system off line. And that could be a dangerous thing.

I highlighted the main point. The Constitution assigns powers, not the president. Obama does not have the power to execute what he has so far merely spoken (but which is being executed nevertheless). How does that happen?

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

Congress may try legislative fixes and fiscal blockades, but the very act(s) itself is invalid. It does not carry the weight of law because it is not law. He has appropriated what does not belong to him, only unlike looters taking flat screen TVs or 12-packs of Miller, he has made off with powers assigned to the legislative branch of the government. And no one is lifting a finger to stop him.

TURLEY: The key to a Madisonian system is that nobody has enough power to go it alone, that was the genius of James Madison. But we’re seeing the rise of a new model of presidency and I believe that supporters of President Obama will rue the day when they stay silent in the face of this kind of concentration of power. This is the very danger that the constitution was designed to prevent, the concentration of power in one person’s hands or one branch…

Correction, Professor Turley. Supporters of President Obama will never “rue the day when they stay[ed] silent in the face of this kind of concentration of power”. If some day the tables are turned (as with the filibuster in the Senate), they will rue nothing. They will shout, declaim, cry, and caterwaul for “fairness” and “justice” until they get their way.

They believe in winning—even more, they believe in the other fellow losing. I thought the Constitution protected us against people like that, but I guess that’s where I was wrong.

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Hangin’ With My Homies

College campuses are reliably leftist, and they don’t come more leftist than Berkeley.

Which is why we’re not surprised:

Effigies of black lynching victims found hanging on a Northern California college campus have sparked debate over whether the images are powerful protest art or just plain tasteless and racist.

The photographic images were found Saturday morning hanging at two prominent spots on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley. They were discovered a few hours before a demonstration against police brutality organized by a black student union was to start. Police are investigating, but officials say they still don’t know who hanged the images or the motivation.

“It’s unclear if this is racially motivated effort or an effort at something else,” campus spokeswoman Claire Holmes said.

Do you think if these effigies had been displayed at, say, Bob Jones University, there would have been a question about the “motivation”? Why give the benefit of the doubt to the socialist redoubt in the Bay Area?

Because there is a “motivation”, however “queer”:

Sunday Dec. 14, 5 p.m.: An anonymous artists’ collective has taken responsibility for the effigies strung up in nooses at UC Berkeley on Saturday.

The statement from the collective:

“We are a collective of queer and POC artists responsible for the images of historical lynchings posted to several locations in Berkeley and Oakland,” reads a notice the group found posted on campus Sunday. “These images connect past events to present ones – referencing endemic faultlines of hatred and persecution that are and should be deeply unsettling to the American consciousness. We choose to remain anonymous because this is not about us as artists, but about the growing movement to address these pervasive wrongs.”

“For those who think these images are no longer relevant to the social framework in which black Americans exist everyday – we respectfully disagree. Garner, Brown, and others are victims of systemic racism. For those who think these images depict crimes and attitudes too distasteful to be seen .. we respectfully disagree. Our society must never forget. For those under the mistaken assumption that the images themselves were intended as an act of racism – we vehemently disagree and intended only the confrontation of historical context.”

“We apologize solely and profusely to Black Americans who felt further attacked by this work. We are sorry – your pain is ours, our families’, our history’s. To all, each image represents a true life ended by an unimaginable act of ignorance and human cruelty: Laura Nelson, George Meadows, Michael Donald, Charlie Hale, Garfield Burley, Curtis Brown. We urge you to further research the lives and deaths of these individuals. History must be confronted.”

POC means persons of color, I take it. Not colored persons, but persons of color. Nice of them to apologize, though. Five words out of 230, buried deep within the screed, directed “solely” at 13% of Americans.

Some of whom aren’t buying:

Berkeley Pastor Michael McBride told the Oakland Tribune that he sees no redeeming quality to the display.

“This is racial terror they are experiencing,” said McBride, who is also co-director of Intervarsity’s Black Campus Ministries at UC Berkeley. “I don’t care if it was a white person, a black person, a blue person, if it was an adversary or ally, these images strewed across campus have terrorized my students.”

I followed the suggestion of the “queers” and POCs and looked up every name they listed. All but one were lynched over a century ago. Hanged by the neck until dead by a terrorist mob yes, but none more recent than 1911. Did the queers and the POCs think we didn’t know that happened? And why equate murdered innocents with two people, Michael Brown and Eric Garner, whose actual law-breaking led people to call the cops?

I will give them full credit for re-exposing one lynching we may have wished to forget. That of Michael Donald in 1981.

Berkeley, man. No [bleeping] wonder.

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