Archive for Jews

Collateral Damage

I say Obama started it; maybe you say Bibi. Or Boeher.

Regardless, the casualty list is growing:

Untitled

A wall-to-wall array of Jewish groups condemned an ad accusing National Security Adviser Susan Rice of turning a blind eye to genocide.

“Susan Rice has a blind spot: Genocide,” said the ad appearing in Saturday’s New York Times, touting a talk on Iran this week in Washington hosted by Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, the New Jersey-based author and pro-Israel advocate.

As soon as the Sabbath ended, Jewish groups rushed to condemn the ad. The American Jewish Committee called it “revolting,” the Anti-Defamation League called it “spurious and perverse”, the Jewish Federations of North America called it “outrageous” and Josh Block, the president of The Israel Project, said it was “entirely inappropriate.”

Marshall Wittmann, the spokesman for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which will host Rice on Monday at its annual conference, said, “Ad hominem attacks should have no place in our discourse.”

I get why they’re trying to distance themselves from the ad, even if I think the ad is valid. History teaches that Jews take the hit in time of conflict; these guys are ducking for cover. But this time is no different. Iran is frantically working toward an arsenal of nuclear weapons. The United States and Israel stand opposed (as does every Arab state, and most other nations in the world). Yet it is Israel and America who are fighting it out in the news.

I would say this is entirely how Iran intended it, and that would be true—but it would be less than half the story. This is how Obama intends it. This is his doing, and Susan Rice or Samantha Power or John Kerry are only his instruments. To his way of thinking, Israel and the US share one too many traits, colonialism most prominently. For the son of a Kenyan Marxist (and philanderer and alcoholic), that is unpardonable.

Dinesh D’Souza:

The climax of Obama’s narrative is when he goes to Kenya and weeps at his father’s grave. It is riveting: “When my tears were finally spent,” he writes, “I felt a calmness wash over me. I felt the circle finally close. I realized that who I was, what I cared about, was no longer just a matter of intellect or obligation, no longer a construct of words. I saw that my life in America–the black life, the white life, the sense of abandonment I’d felt as a boy, the frustration and hope I’d witnessed in Chicago–all of it was connected with this small piece of earth an ocean away, connected by more than the accident of a name or the color of my skin. The pain that I felt was my father’s pain.”

In an eerie conclusion, Obama writes that “I sat at my father’s grave and spoke to him through Africa’s red soil.” In a sense, through the earth itself, he communes with his father and receives his father’s spirit. Obama takes on his father’s struggle, not by recovering his body but by embracing his cause. He decides that where Obama Sr. failed, he will succeed. Obama Sr.’s hatred of the colonial system becomes Obama Jr.’s hatred; his botched attempt to set the world right defines his son’s objective. Through a kind of sacramental rite at the family tomb, the father’s struggle becomes the son’s birthright.

Colonialism today is a dead issue. No one cares about it except the man in the White House. He is the last anticolonial.

Obama may not want to “wipe Israel off the map”, as Iran does, but he would like to see it cut down to size. The era of European outposts in indigenous lands (as he sees the Zionist entity) is over. It is past time that the post-colonial powers redress the “legitimate grievances” (a phrase Obama even when talking about ISIS!) of those oppressed by the past, be they African or Arab, Sunni or Shiite. The so-called Palestinians may be an invented identity, squatting in historically Jewish lands, but in Obama’s eyes they are perfectly cast in the role of oppressed minority. He’s not alone in that way of thinking, of course—even Condoleezza Rice likened the so-called Palestinians to the civil rights strugglers of her youth.

Who is this upstart, then, to speak against his dearest held beliefs? This foreigner who speaks English almost as well as His Articulateness? (Better, I would argue, as Netanyahu’s rhetoric is grounded in military and political battle, while Obama has been handed every success, including the presidency, based on an invented autobiography written by Bill Ayers.) Obama may hate Netanyahu—he sure seems to—but this mess is more than about private beefs. It’s a profound dispute over civilization.

If Early Obama was about getting high, and Middle Obama was about getting elected, Late Obama is about getting even. We have seen his recent determination in domestic politics by legally questionable executive orders and actions that bypass Congress, rewriting legislation (often more than once) to fit his fancy. And we see it in matters of state by this fight he and he alone has picked with Netanyahu. Everyone else—Rice, Kerry, Power, Psaki, the CBC, everybody—merely projects Obama’s thoughts.

Again, while the enmity is personal and deep, it is also philosophical. Netanyahu speaks as leader of a country with religious, cultural, and historic ties to its land. Obama sees it as an anachronism. Netanyahu sees the mullahs and ayatollahs of Iran through the eyes of a people who have seen popes, emperors, cossacks, czars and obergrüppenführers sworn to their extinction. Obama sees their “legitimate grievances”.

Worse yet, Netanyahu will speak directly to the people. Obama is most successful when his guard-dog media savages anyone who rises against him. Netanyahu is his worst nightmare: someone who will have direct access to Americans, and speak to them in their own language. (Indeed, his Wikipedia article notes he still speaks English with the Philly accent he learned as a teenager.) And he will speak from the heart—not only his own, but his nation’s and his people’s.

America elected Obama, twice, and Jews make up barely 2% of the population. But America loves Israel anyway, more than Obama knows. Or maybe he does know, and that’s why he’s so scared.

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Vigil Ante

I admit I ignored this for a day or so as inadequate or irrelevant.

But now I’m not so sure:

Hundreds of people were expected at a peace vigil in Oslo Saturday, hosted by young Norwegian Muslims expressing solidarity with Jews a week after fatal shootings in Denmark targeted a synagogue and free speech seminar.

The initiative by Norway’s Muslim youth to link arms with Norwegian Jews in a circle around Oslo’s synagogue was an effort to denounce recent violence by Muslim jihadists striking Jewish communities in France and Denmark.

“We want to show that we stand with the Jewish people and protect them. We don’t want extremists in Norway who think they can do as they wish to ordinary people,” 26-year-old Atif Jamil, one of the organizers of the human chain told AFP on Saturday.

Isn’t this what we’ve been asking for? For Muslims to act, rather than excuse or complain? What better retort to Obama than this?

The Oslo vigil was to take place after Shabbat early on Saturday evening. Even before the event began, leaders of Norway’s Jewish and Muslim communities said it had given them hope for the future.

“The beautiful thing is that Muslim youth want to stand up against anti-Semitism, and that gives me hope,” Norway’s Jewish community leader Ervin Kohn told news agency NTB.

“I hope this can be the start of a completely different kind of Muslim-Jewish dialogue both in Norway and internationally,” he added.

Leaders of Norway’s Muslim community have condemned the Copenhagen killings.

Youssef Bartho Assidiq, a Muslim youth leader, claimed to AFP that the event proved that Muslims “stand up for freedom of speech, stand up for freedom of religion and stand up for each other”.

“This is the best possible response we can give to the polarization we’ve seen in debates after the attacks in France and Denmark,” he said.

Now, I know what you’re thinking:

Despite the positive views being voiced around the event, Norway reportedly has the highest level of anti-Semitic beliefs of any Nordic country. The large Muslim community in Norway seems to have a relation to the rise of anti-Semitism.

In one example from January 2013, Nehmat Ali Shah, the imam at Norway’s largest mosque – the Jamaat-e Ahl-e Sunnat mosque – claimed in an interview with Dagsavisen that the existing hostility between Muslims and Christians is caused by Jewish influence.

Said an imam whose followers outnumber Jews 13-1 in Norway.

From just four months ago:

Norwegians hold the most anti-Semitic beliefs of all citizens in Nordic countries – warns the president of the Jewish community in Norway, Ervin Kohn

According to him, the level of anti-Semitism is growing and in many schools throughout the country, being called “Jew” has become nothing short of a curse. “Along with the well-known curses, ‘Jew’ has become a dirty word common in many schools,” he said.

Sorry to bring you down, but if it’s unadulterated good news you want, you should know by now this ain’t the blog. I am gladdened to see the cooperation of Muslims and Jews in the protection of the synagogue, even moved. But I am not fooled. I can’t help thinking that each of Norway’s 1,300 Jews—about the average seating capacity of a Broadway theater—would be safer in Israel. As great a shame as it would be for Fjord-ler on the Roof to close, it would be a greater shame for tragedy to play out.

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Breaking News From 1939

To borrow from James Taranto:

The continuing decline of Europe’s Jewish population

It’s been seven decades since the end of the Holocaust, an event that decimated the Jewish population in Europe. In the years since then, the number of European Jews has continued to decline for a variety of reasons. And now, concerns over renewed anti-Semitism on the continent have prompted Jewish leaders to talk of a new “exodus” from the region.

There are still more than a million Jews living in Europe, according to 2010 Pew Research Center estimates. But that number has dropped significantly over the last several decades – most dramatically in Eastern Europe and the countries that make up the former Soviet Union, according to historical research by Sergio DellaPergola of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

In 1939, there were 16.6 million Jews worldwide, and a majority of them – 9.5 million, or 57% – lived in Europe, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. By the end of World War II, in 1945, the Jewish population of Europe had shrunk to 3.8 million, or 35% of the world’s 11 million Jews. About 6 million European Jews were killed during the Holocaust, according to common estimates.

Since then, the global Jewish population – estimated by Pew Research at 14 million as of 2010 – has risen, but it is still smaller than it was before the Holocaust. And in the decades since 1945, the Jewish population in Europe has continued to decline. In 1960, it was about 3.2 million; by 1991, it fell to 2 million, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. Now, there are about 1.4 million Jews in Europe – just 10% of the world’s Jewish population, and 0.2% of Europe’s total population.

They say “now”, but I think now—as in after Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher—there are significantly fewer. The history of judenrein is not a happy one—not for the juden, and not for the rein. Whether it’s Eurabia they want, it’s Eurabia they’ve got.

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Shh! Don’t Mention the Jews!

What’s missing from this picture?

Bipartisan criticism of President Barack Obama’s proposed authorization of force against ISIS mostly has to do with the use of U.S. troops and limits on the commander-in-chief. But one Republican lawmaker noticed something else that he calls quite troubling – omission of the word “Jews.”

Freshman Lee Zeldin is the only Republican Jewish member of Congress, and says it immediately leapt off the page that the President’s proposed resolution specifically singles out several ethnic groups threatened by ISIS: Iraqi Christians, Yezidis and Turkmens, but says nothing about Jews.

“I see an understanding, a recognition in the resolution with regards to ISIS attacks on Muslims, on Christians and others, and I didn’t see a reference to Jews,” Zeldin told CNN in an interview. “And one of the efforts I’ve been involved in is trying to raise awareness for the rising tide of anti-semitism.”

The New York Republican questioned whether the White House deliberately left out Jews as an ethnic group that ISIS has threatened.

Of course they did. As we reported yesterday, they refuse to acknowledge the murder of “folks” in a kosher deli by a bunch of “zealots” as anything but “random”. As I wrote, “Do they hate Israel (apparently) and Netanyahu (absolutely) so much that they would deny a narrative that makes Jews sympathetic?”

Yup.

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Les Juifs Sont Fait

We’ve visited this story (and used this title) before. Might as well use it while we can:

A record number of French Jews flocked to “Israel opportunities” fairs throughout France this week, as Israeli officials anticipate an unprecedented wave of French aliyah to only increase in 2015.

Some 8,000 people, mostly between the ages of 16 and 35, have visited the “Orient-a-Sion” fairs taking place in Paris, Lyon and Marseilles – well over 1% of the entire French Jewish community.

“We have been doing this for years, and we could not believe our eyes,” said Daniel Benhaim, head of the Jewish Agency delegation in France. “By 10 a.m., there was a line around the block.”

Echoing statements by other Israeli officials – including Jewish Agency Chairman Natan Sharansky – Benhaim expressed confidence that the number of Jews leaving France for Israel would break last year’s record figure of more than 7,200. Those numbers were more than double the previous year (3,400) and triple the number seen in 2012 (1,900).

In Paris alone, some 6,000 people participated in the event, three times the 2,000 who attended last year.

Last time Jews left France in these numbers…well, never mind. This time it will be by their choice.

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Je Suis Outta Here

We’ve covered some of this ground already, but not in the presence of the divine Caroline Glick:

January 16 is the nine-year anniversary of the beginning of the Ilan Halimi disaster.

On January 16, 2006, Sorour Arbabzadeh, the seductress from the Muslim anti-Jewish kidnapping gang led by Youssouf Fofana, entered the cellphone store where Halimi worked and set the honey trap.

Four days later, Halimi met Arbabzadeh for a drink at a working class bar and agreed to walk her home. She walked him straight into an ambush. Her comrades beat him, bound him and threw him into the trunk of their car.

They brought Halimi to a slum apartment and tortured him for 24 days and 24 nights before dumping him, handcuffed, naked, stabbed and suffering from third degree burns over two-thirds of his body, at a railway siding in Paris.

He died a few hours later in the hospital.

Measured by duration and premeditation, the Halimi torture must rank as the second-worst of France’s recent brushes with Muslim terrorism—worse than the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher massacres, not as horrific as the Toulouse slaughter of Jewish schoolchildren. (Your rankings may differ.)

But is that how France saw it?

The anti-Jewish nature of the gang was clear from its chosen victims. The anti-Semitic nature of their atrocious crime against Halimi was obvious from the first time they contacted his mother, Ruth Halimi, demanding ransom for his release. They made anti-Jewish slurs in all their communications with her.

And as she heard her sons tortured cries in the background, Ruth was subjected to his torturers’ recitation of Koranic verses.

And yet, throughout the period of his captivity, French authorities refused to consider the anti-Jewish nature of the crime, and as a result, refused to treat the case as life threatening or urgent.

The same attitude continued well after Halimi was found. As Weitzmann noted, the investigative magistrate insisted “There isn’t a single element to allow one to attach this murder to an anti-Semitic purpose or an anti-Semitic act.”

The denial went on through the 2009 trials of the 29 kidnappers and their accomplices. Anti-Semitism was listed as an aggravating circumstance of the crime – and as such, a cause for harsher sentencing – only for the gang leader Fofana. And in the end, even for him, the judges did not take it into account at sentencing.

As for those 29 kidnappers and accomplices, as Weitzmann notes, each one of them had a circle of friends and family.

As a consequence, by a one reporters’ conservative estimate, at least 50 people were aware of the crime and where Halimi was being held, while he was being held. And not one of them called the police. Not one of them felt moved to make a call that could save the life of a Jew.

After the fact, the media in France were happy to publish articles by the torturers’ defense lawyers insisting, “Only people motivated by ‘political reasons’ would try to sell the opinion that anti-Semitism is eating away at French society.”

[W]hen Halimi, and six years later when the three children and the rabbi massacred at Otzar Hatorah Jewish day school in Toulouse, were brought to Israel for burial, the media reported their decision in a negative way hinting that it was evidence of the basic disloyalty, or otherness of the Jews of France.

We made the same point about Netanyahu’s insistence on coming to France for the public memorial and march for the victims. Remember, their families had asked that they be buried in Israel. It was only proper that he (even if only symbolically) accompany their bodies to their ancestral home. And he should be praised, not scourged, for offering a home to living French Jews, not just dead ones.

Glick looks at the last nine years of France’s relations with its Jews and sees the same merde, different jour.

[W]hat Halimi’s murder exposed is that anti-Semitism in France is systemic. Muslims are the main perpetrators of violence. And they operate in social environments that are at a minimum indifferent to Jewish suffering and victimization. This violence and indifference is abetted by non-Islamic elites. French authorities minimize the unique threat Jews face. And the media are happy to ignore the issue, or when given the slightest opportunity, to claim that the Jews are responsible for their own victimization.

Indeed, in live reports from the scene of the hostage taking at the kosher supermarket in Paris last week, Weitzmann noted that in the early hours of the attack, French media failed to mention that the hostages were Jews.

This line is a whopper:

When all is said and done, it is their necks on the line while humanity’s conscience is merely troubled.

PS: I wrote yesterday about the flaming a-hole on NPR who ragged on Netanyahu and Israel. One of his points I forgot to mention is that he didn’t think many French Jews would pursue the aliyah suggested by Neyanyahu. His ignorance knows no bounds:

Speaking of aliya is also essential because so far the only thing that has caused French authorities to speak directly against anti-Semitism and take action to defend French Jewry has been the prospect of a mass exodus of their Jews.

The year 2014 saw a 50 percent increase in French aliya. And the Jewish Agency anticipates that that number will double to 15,000 in 2015, with 50,000 more not far behind.

If Jews don’t flee France in 2016, it will be because they’ve already left.

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Sounds Great

The French have always had a way with words:

“If 100,000 French people of Spanish origin were to leave, I would never say that France is not France anymore. But if 100,000 Jews leave, France will no longer be France. The French Republic will be judged a failure.”

I’ve written before of the manifest failures of the French Revolution. Not just the terreur and the slaughter of thousands by the mob, but the usurpation of power by Napoleon, the various restorations and monarchies, the interruptions of “republics” by “empires”. Modern republican France dates from 1870 (the Third Republic), not from 1789.

Anyhow:

“Jews were sometimes marginalized in France, but this was not Spain or other countries—they were never expelled, and they play a role in the life of France that is central,” he said.

Again, lovely sentiment. Just not exactly true:

Expulsion from France, 1182…The Great Exile of 1306…Expulsion of 1394

That’s earlier than Spain (1492), earlier than Britain (1290). There are even earlier expulsions under the auspices of the Church.

But again, appreciate the sentiment.

“There is a new anti-Semitism in France,” he told me. “We have the old anti-Semitism, and I’m obviously not downplaying it, that comes from the extreme right, but this new anti-Semitism comes from the difficult neighborhoods, from immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa, who have turned anger about Gaza into something very dangerous. Israel and Palestine are just a pretext. There is something far more profound taking place now.”

In discussing the attacks on French synagogues and Jewish-owned businesses this summer, during the Gaza war, he said, “It is legitimate to criticize the politics of Israel. This criticism exists in Israel itself. But this is not what we are talking about in France. This is radical criticism of the very existence of Israel, which is anti-Semitic. There is an incontestable link between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism. Behind anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.”

Though he worries about fear-driven emigration, Valls told me he believes that the government can work with the Jewish community to make it more secure. “The Jews of France are profoundly attached to France but they need reassurance that they are welcome here, that they are secure here.”

If we don’t remember Ilan Halimi, French Jews do. They also remember Toulouse—after which then-President Nicolas Sarkozy said:

“We should not back down in the face of terror,” Mr Sarkozy said, his voice cracking as he paid tribute to the parents and school authorities. “Barbarism, savagery, hate must not win. The Republic is much stronger than that.

“You cannot murder children like this on the territory of the Republic without being held to account,” he said. “Today is a day of national tragedy.”

“I want to say to all the leaders of the Jewish community, how close we feel to them. All of France is by their side,” he said.

Aw, isn’t that sweet? Almost as nice as they’re talking today.

I wish Jews could live safely in every country of the world, but I would settle for even a few. Alas, I doubt we can count France among their number.

PS: This was about all that was said after Halimi’s torture and murder:

Last night, President Jacques Chirac and his prime minister, Dominique de Villepin, attended a memorial service for Mr Halimi in Paris’s main synagogue.

Mr de Villepin said he hoped Fofana would quickly face trial for “this odious crime”.

Merci beaucoup, hairdo.

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My Kind of Muslim

Many Muslims have said they bear no responsibility for the actions of a few. Some on the Left have accused those who suggest otherwise of bigotry and racism.

This guy might disagree:

The number of people killed at a Kosher supermarket Friday in the Porte de Vincennes neighborhood of Paris could well have been higher were it not for the resourcefulness and calm thinking of a market employee named Lassana Bathily.

Bathily, 24, a Muslim immigrant from Mali, was working in the store when the Islamist gunman Amedy Coulibaly burst in.

Up to 15 of the customers who were in the store ran down to the store basement, when Bathily had an idea.

“When they ran down, I opened the door [to the freezer],” he told France’s BFMTV.

He quickly shut off the freezer and switched off its light. As he closed the door to shelter the customers inside, he reportedly told them, “Stay calm here. I’m going out.”

When it was all over, and the hostages were freed from the freezer, they thanked Bathily. “They congratulated me,” he told BFMTV.

As do we. As should all of France. As should any Muslim toward someone who brought humanity to their faith when so many had stained it with subhumanity.

Whether he is a Righteous Gentile I cannot say, but he is a righteous gentile.

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NOW DO YOU GET IT??!?

Sorry to shout, but people need to hear this:

Both of the brothers, who were born in Paris to Algerian immigrants, were already known to French counter-terrorism authorities according to France 24.

Cherif was handed 18 months in prison back in 2008 for trying to fly to Iraq to join terrorist organizations there and take part in the fighting.

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve on Thursday revealed that Cherif at the time was described by fellow aspiring jihadists as “violently anti-Semitic.” He added that Said, an unemployed resident of Reims, was known largely because of his involvement in his younger brother’s activities.

Cherif, a former pizza deliveryman, appeared in a 2005 French TV documentary on Islamic extremism.

Standard disclaimer: not all Islamic pizza deliverymen are terrorists, but some Islamic pizza deliverymen who are “violently anti-Semitic” are likely to become terrorists.

Do you want to stop terrorists before they attack? Look for the violent anti-semitism. Even if you don’t care about your Jews, France (those that remain), they are your canaries in the mineshaft. All that noise about les juifs being descendée from singes et porcs? That’s French for “you’re next”.

Me, je ne suis pas Charlie.

Je suis Dalal Mughrabi.

Can I get a do-over? I don’t want to be that skanky hag.

I want to be an angel.

Save yourselves, France (and Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, Italy, England, stop me when I reach Greenland). As the old saying goes: first they come for the Jews. You’re supposed to take that as a warning, not a tiding of great joy.

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Want to Know the Difference Between London and New York?

London:

Muhammad and Amelia have been revealed as the most popular names for baby boys and girls in London.

Figures from the Office of National Statistics show Muhammad overtook Daniel as the capital’s name of choice, while Amelia trumped Olivia to take top spot for girls.

Mohammed – spelt with an ‘o’ and an ‘e’ – also makes an entry at number four in the top 10 most popular boys names in London.

New York City:

New York City’s Health Department has released its annual breakdown of popular baby names. Besides the general top 10, there are also lists for different ethnicities: Among white babies, Esther was the third most popular girls’ name, trailed by Sarah, Leah, Rachel, Chaya, Miriam, and Chana, all in the top 10.

Leah was seventh among all girls’ names, regardless of ethnicity, up from number nine.

The most popular boys’ names included Moshe at number four, alongside biblical names also common among non-Jews, like David, Joseph, Daniel, Benjamin, and Jacob.

If you’re wondering about the qualifier “white” babies, don’t suspect base motives. So many more black babies are aborted in New York than are born, it’s just not a decent sample size.

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Another Season, Another Reason, For Making Aliyah

Aggie told you how French Jews are leaving the dog doo and antisemitism of Paris behind and heading to Israel (and bringing their cuisine with them!).

Look who’s close behind!

More than 3,700 Jews from the U.S. and Canada as well as 525 from the United Kingdom, moved to Israel over the last year, Ynet reported, citing a 7 percent increase in those arriving from North America and a 32 percent increase overall. About 20,000 immigrants arrived in 2013.

I can’t speak for the French or Ukrainian Jews, but the Americans are going to want their own homes. I can see the Judean Hills sprinkled with McMansions!

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Apartheid State Update

Not the apartheid state you were expecting….

But then, it never is:

The deputy speaker of the Swedish parliament caused an outrage by suggesting that Jews living in Sweden should ditch their identity if they wish to be considered Swedes.

The claim by Bjorn Soder, of the Sweden Democrats party, was made in an interview with a Swedish newspaper, according to the International Business Times.

In the interview, Soder said that “most Jewish people in Sweden left behind” their racial identity in order to assimilate.

He further said that it would be a problem if there were too many people in Sweden “who belong to other nations” and had non-Swedish identities. Paying immigrants to go home would also help to avoid “foreign enclaves” and instead “create a society with a common identity”, he said, according to remarks quoted by The Guardian.

Those of us familiar with the, ahem, social unrest, in Malmo might not disagree with him. Except he’s got the wrong Great World Religion. Estimates of 500,000 Muslims in Sweden date from 2009.

More recent counts (given the refugees from Islam’s many uncivil wars) put the number at 700,000.

There are 20,000 Jews.

That’s 2.8% the number of Muslims, 0.2% of the Swedish population overall.

And Jews are Sweden’s problem.

The leader of Sweden’s Jewish community condemned the remarks as “good old rightwing anti-Semitism”, saying that the comments conveyed a message that Jews were untrustworthy and could not be considered real Swedes, “exactly like in 1930s Germany” from which her grandfather had fled.

Lena Posner Körösi, president of the Official Council of Jewish Communities in Sweden, was quoted by The Guardian as having said the remarks showed “the mask is slipping” from the face of Sweden Democrats to reveal the essence of what they stand for.

“I am appalled that Sweden’s third largest party can express itself in this way about Jews and other minorities,” she said. “We have to take them really seriously. This not a small group of fanatics you can dismiss.”

Soder claimed in response the remarks were taken out of context.

Fair enough. Perhaps we should be more understanding. Look how his mother dresses him:

As people who believe in Israel as a Jewish state, we don’t object to Sweden as a Swedish state. But we would ask Sweden to be a little more discriminating (if that’s the word) toward whomever it is that threatens their Swedosity. In the Swedish body politic Jews are an earlobe or an eye brow. They’re not your problem. They never are.

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