Archive for Eric Holder

Picking Up the Pieces of a Shattered Justice System

You think the immigrations system is “broken” (everyone’s favorite word)?

After Ferguson, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put Justice together again:

And it confirms that eyewitnesses either lied to investigators or refused to be interviewed out of fear of local vigilantes.

“Witness 109 claimed to have witnessed the shooting, stated that it was justified, and repeatedly refused to give formal statements to law enforcement for fear of reprisal should the Canfield Drive neighborhood find out that his account corroborated Wilson.”

Witness 113 “gave an account that generally corroborated Wilson, but only after she was confronted with statements she initially made in an effort to avoid neighborhood backlash. . . . She explained to the FBI that ‘You’ve gotta live the life to know it,’ and stated that she feared offering an account contrary to the narrative reported by the media that Brown held his hands up in surrender.”

Now there’s a story for the media: A community in which honest people can’t tell the truth for fear of running afoul local thugs enforcing “the narrative reported by the media.” Or is that more of a story about the media?

Courts can send you to the can for five years for the crime of perjury; another five for suborning perjury. Intimidating a witness has its own set of sentencing guidelines.

How many of you out there think a single witness or community “activist” will be charged with lying before the Grand Jury? Me neither. Same goes for those who looted, pillaged, and incited riot. Nothing. No justice.

So, Darren Wilson gets off (under an assumed name and new identity somewhere in Idaho); not so lucky Ferguson:

But let’s move to the other Ferguson fable, which is the Justice Department’s allegation, in an unfortunate second report, of systemic racism in the Ferguson police department.

This isn’t to say that the report doesn’t uncover more serious problems, including a number of racist emails in the department, policing that seems needlessly obnoxious or aggressive, and a municipal government desperate to prosecute every minor violation of the law in order to maximize city revenues—in effect, using cops as taxmen.

But this only demonstrates the journalistic truism that you can always find the “story” you’re looking for. Using ticket revenue and other fines to raise revenues is one of the oldest municipal tricks in the book, so much so that the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis even published a paper about it in 2006. “As local tax bases have been exhausted and public opposition to increases in local tax rates have increased over time, local governments face increased pressure to find alternative sources of revenue,” noted economists Thomas Garrett and Gary Wagner.

That turns out to be as true in Milwaukee, Nashville and Washington, D.C., as it is in Ferguson. So are we talking about institutional racism or just the usual government bloodsucking?

Exactly. The police were acting on instructions from elected officials. Just as they were in Staten Island, when trying to arrest Eric Garner for the tax crime of selling loose cigarettes on the street corner. It is a terrible use (and abuse) of police power, corrosive to the relationship between the officer on the beat and the community, but it is lawful. Blame the politicians who demand it, not the cops forced to carry it out. Same goes for the SWAT teams fielded by any number of federal agencies, from Education to the Railroad Retirement Board.

[T]he lesson of Ferguson is that there is no truth in statistics. There is truth in fact. There is truth in reason. There is truth in truthfulness. Nothing less.

To which I would add there is no truth in anything Obama and Holder have to say on race. None. Which is why they return to the subject so often.

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Where Does Darren Wilson Go to Get His Reputation Back?

Witness protection:

The Justice Department formally closed its investigation of Ferguson Police officer Darren Wilson, declining to bring criminal charges for the killing of Michael Brown.

In a report released Wednesday, prosecutors said that “Wilson’s actions do not constitute prosecutable violations” of federal civil rights law.

“There is no evidence upon which prosecutors can rely to disprove Wilson’s stated subjective belief that he feared for his safety,” the Justice Department report said.

The Justice Department investigation found that Brown reached into Wilson’s squad car and that a struggle ensued. Prosecutors couldn’t corroborate Wilson’s claim that Brown reached for his gun, but couldn’t find any evidence to disprove Wilson’s account. Brown moved at least 180 feet away from Wilson, but then turned and moved toward the officer, prosecutors said. Several witnesses claimed that Brown had his hands up, signaling surrender, when Wilson shot him. Some gave varying accounts, and some later recanted those claims made in media interviews.

The report says: “While credible witnesses gave varying accounts of exactly what Brown was doing with his hands as he moved toward Wilson — i.e., balling them, holding them out, or pulling up his pants — and varying accounts of how he was moving — i.e. ‘charging,’ moving in ‘slow motion’ or ‘running’ — they all establish that Brown was moving toward Wilson when Wilson shot him.”

Hands up, don’t shoot? Try hands out, don’t stint.

But Holder always gets his man (in blue):

In a separate report, the Justice Department described what it said was a “pattern and practice” of discrimination against African-Americans by the Ferguson police and municipal courts.

The department suggested 26 recommendations, including requiring the Ferguson police to providing training to ensure officers aren’t using bias in policing; that officers practice community policing by getting out of their cars and getting to know their communities; and that the police focus stops, searches and ticketing on protecting the public instead of as a fundraising method for the city’s coffers.

The investigation found that the Ferguson police and courts used minor traffic and other violations to raise money for the city, targeted African-American motorists for traffic infractions, and black residents disproportionately for violations such as jay walking.

Fine. Squeeze the cops till it hurts. As a jay walker of pallor, I support the equal opportunity to cross against the light. But I wouldn’t be surprised if you could find this sort of behavior in most police departments. The Ferguson fracas and fiasco wasn’t about the execution of an unarmed black man; it wasn’t about how much black lives matter; it was about jay walking. What a waste of time, money, and wide-screen TVs.

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That’s It?

To employ one of my recurrent themes: what was that all about?

ACCORDING TO a report in Monday’s New York Times, the Justice Department is preparing to tell the embattled Ferguson, Mo., police department to shape up or get sued. In an impending analysis, the Justice Department will reportedly accuse Ferguson authorities of racially discriminatory practices, a move that will force them to change their behavior voluntarily or face a federal civil rights lawsuit.

Uh-oh. Here comes the boom:

Justice Department investigators conducted a wide-ranging inquiry into the Ferguson police, from patrol car to lockup. One major finding, according to the Times, is that officers disproportionately pull over and arrest African Americans.

Eric Holder storms into Ferguson, MO like some crusading crime fighter, with the might and weight of the Justice Department behind him (and the rest of the Executive Branch behind them), and all he comes up with is excessive traffic stops for black people? For cause, it would seem, given the arrests that followed?

That’s it?

I use the analogy too often, but it so often fits: they nailed Al Capone only for tax evasion. Except in this case, the Ferguson PD isn’t guilty of much more than excessive ticketing (if even that). If the arrests after the traffic stops were bogus, I’m sure the Justice Department would have said so.

Michael Brown didn’t die because he or anyone else was pulled over in a traffic stop. He died because he got high, knocked over a convenience store (roughing up the owner in the process), walked obliviously down the middle of the street and MF-ed the cop who told him to knock it off, got into a fight with said cop, punching him and trying to grab his sidearm, then bull-rushed the cop when ordered to stop leaving the scene of the above crimes.

For Holder and company to go all Elliot Ness on FPD and come away with this report is an embarrassment. To Eric Holder.

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The Fix Is In

Not that there was any doubt:

The Obama administration is refusing to publicly release more than 500 documents on the IRS’s targeting of Tea Party groups.

Twenty months after the IRS scandal broke, there are still many unanswered questions about who was spearheading the agency’s scrutiny of conservative-leaning organizations.

The Hill sought access to government documents that might provide a glimpse of the decision-making through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request.

The Hill asked for 2013 emails and other correspondence between the IRS and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA). The request specifically sought emails from former IRS official Lois Lerner and Treasury officials, including Secretary Jack Lew, while the inspector general was working on its explosive May 2013 report that the IRS used “inappropriate criteria” to review the political activities of tax-exempt groups.

TIGTA opted not to release any of the 512 documents covered by the request, citing various exemptions in the law. The Hill recently appealed the FOIA decision, but TIGTA denied the appeal. TIGTA also declined to comment for this article.

You demand justice?

Here ya go:

Holder conducted an interview with Melissa Harris-Perry on topics ranging from the Voting Rights Act to Ferguson, Missouri to the noises made by water birds.

“You know, we call you the duck,” Harris-Perry told Holder. “In nerdland,” she began, referring to her show’s fans.

“The duck?” a puzzled Holder asked.

“We call you the duck. In nerdland we say you have sort of a placid and even way of presenting, but you are just working for justice underneath,” explained Harris-Perry, mimicking the paddling motion of a duck as she shook her head feverishly.

Did it make her tampon earrings flop around?

“Would you quack for us?” Harris-Perry asked sincerely.

“Well, I’m not sure I’m going to do that, but, uh, I like the analogy,” Holder answered.

“You do like the analogy? Good!” Harris-Perry responded.

If we’re going to compare the Attorney General to fowl, I’d go with chickens**t.

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Are We Done Here?

Now that a grand jury has rendered its judgement, it’s time Michael Brown and Darren Wilson be judged by a higher power.

Eric Holder:

A federal investigation has not found enough evidence to charge Darren Wilson with the federal crime of depriving Michael Brown of his civil rights, according to multiple sources familiar with the investigation.

The FBI has completed its investigation into the August shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, and sent the findings to the Justice Department, a law enforcement official and a separate U.S. official said Wednesday.

Justice Department prosecutors will not recommend civil rights charges against Wilson, who killed Brown, because there is not sufficient evidence to support charges, a U.S. official told CNN.

Ultimately, the decision will be made by Attorney General Eric Holder, who has said he will announce a decision before he leaves office, which is expected to be by spring.

He can’t get gone soon enough. Too bad for him he won’t take Officer Wilson’s scalp with him.

Black lives matter—absolutely they do—even in suicide by cop. Can we now let Michael Brown’s memory rest in peace?

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We Are Not Charlie

Gosh, everyone is in Paris!

Well, almost everyone:

At least 3.7 million people including more than 40 world leaders are marching throughout France on Sunday in a rally of national unity to honor the 17 victims of a three-day terror spree that took place around the French capital.

The French Interior Ministry said the rally for unity against terrorism is the largest demonstration in France’s history, more than the numbers who took to Paris streets when the Allies liberated the city from the Nazis in World War II.

“Today, Paris is the capital of the world,” said French President Francois Hollande. “Our entire country will rise up toward something better.”

Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas were among the leaders attending, as were top representatives of Russia and Ukraine. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron were alongside Hollande at the front of the crowd, estimated to be around one million people, Sky News reports.

Wait. Isn’t someone missing?

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is in Paris this week to attend a meeting on fighting terrorism, but did not participate in the march.

Holder? Didn’t he resign? He did, three and a half months ago! What’s he doing there?

And why not someone a little higher up the food chain than an ex-Attorney General?

What was Obama doing?

Obama Schedule || Monday, January 12, 2014
by KEITH KOFFLER on JANUARY 11, 2015, 8:37 PM
10:00 am || Receives the Presidential Daily Briefing
11:55 am || Lays out plan to combat identity theft and improve consumer and student privacy; Federal Trade Commission Offices, Washington
2:40 pm || Honors the 2014 NBA Champions the San Antonio Spurs; East Room

I understand Obama will wear a t-shirt that reads “Je Suis Manu Ginóbili” to the ceremony.

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How Can We Miss You When You Won’t Get the F**k Outta Here?

With all due respect, of course, to the retiring (though he’s anything but) Attorney General of the United States:

In an interview with MSNBC’s Joy Reid in a replica of the bus Rosa Parks rode, Attorney General Eric Holder discussed the lack of respect shown by his political opponents and if a white attorney general would receive the same treatment as him.

“I can’t look into the hearts and minds of people who have been, perhaps, my harshest critics,” Holder said. “I think a large part of the criticism is political in nature. Whether there is a racial component or not, you know, I don’t know.”

“Do you feel you’ve been especially disrespected as attorney general?” Reid asked Holder.

“I think it’s unfortunately part of Washington in 2014,” Holder said. “I would hope that my successor would not have to endure some of the thing is did. I say endure only because I think I’ve shown respect where, perhaps, I haven’t been given any.”

Holder said there have been times when he “wanted to just snap back” and “be a lot more aggressive.”

“There are times when I’ve wanted to just snap back,” Attorney General Holder said. “There are occasions when I have. But there have been frequently more times when I’ve wanted to, you know, be a lot more aggressive in the responses that I’ve made.”

Ask John Ashcroft how it felt to be Attorney General, when almost no Democrats supported his initial appointment. Ask Alberto Gonzalez, who also got no love from the Dems, despite being the first Latino AG—indeed the highest Latino in US government to that date (just as Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice had been the first black and female Secys of State respectively). Talk about your war on women, blacks, and Hispanics!

Let’s take a look at a little bit of Eric Holder not snapping back.

“A nation of cowards”:

Though this nation has proudly thought of itself as an ethnic melting pot, in things racial we have always been and continue to be, in too many ways, essentially a nation of cowards.

Ever wonder why, Eric (the Red)?

Fast and Furious:

“I want to be clear: Any instance of so-called ‘gun walking’ is unacceptable,” Holder said of weapons smuggling, later adding: “This operation was flawed in its concept, and flawed in its execution.”

No [bleep], Sherlock.

Myopia:

“You constantly hear about voter fraud … but you don’t see huge amounts of vote fraud out there,’’ Holder said.

J-u-u-u-st enough, I would say:

Attorney General Eric Holder finally got fed up Tuesday with claims that the Justice Department went easy in a voting rights case against members of the New Black Panther Party because they are African American.

“When you compare what people endured in the South in the 60s to try to get the right to vote for African Americans, and to compare what people were subjected to there to what happened in Philadelphia—which was inappropriate, certainly that…to describe it in those terms I think does a great disservice to people who put their lives on the line, who risked all, for my people,” said Holder, who is black.

“To compare that kind of courage, that kind of action, and to say that the Black Panther incident wrong thought it might be somehow is greater in magnitude or is of greater concern to us, historically, I think just flies in the face of history and the facts.”

How about due process:

“The reality is that we will be reading Miranda rights to the corpse of Osama Bin Laden – he will never appear in an American courtroom,” the nation’s chief enforcement officer told a stunned House hearing.

No argument from me. But isn’t that the same kind of talk that got Bush labeled a “cowboy”?

More due process:

President Barack Obama predicted that professed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed will be convicted and executed as Attorney General Eric Holder proclaimed: “Failure is not an option.”

Even if a terror trial suspect were acquitted, Holder said, he would not be released in the United States.

In one of a series of TV interviews during his trip to Asia, Obama said those offended by the legal privileges given to Mohammed by virtue of getting a civilian trial rather than a military tribunal won’t find it “offensive at all when he’s convicted and when the death penalty is applied to him.”

Obama quickly added that he did not mean to suggest he was prejudging the outcome of Mohammed’s trial. “I’m not going to be in that courtroom,” he said. “That’s the job of the prosecutors, the judge and the jury.”

In interviews broadcast on NBC and CNN Wednesday, the president also said that experienced prosecutors in the case who specialize in terrorism have offered assurances that “we’ll convict this person with the evidence they’ve got, going through our system.”

Holder sought to explain his prosecutorial strategy Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee, where lawmakers questioned him along largely partisan lines over his decision last week to send Mohammed and four alleged henchmen from a detention center at Guantanamo Bay to New York to face a civilian federal trial in New York.

Asked what might happen if the suspects are acquitted, Holder replied: “Failure is not an option. These are cases that have to be won. I don’t expect that we will have a contrary result.”

That’s the President of the United States and the Attorney General prejudging (literally) a civilian trial. Saddam Hussein couldn’t have done better. Homosexuals in Iran are more likely to get off. (Wipe that smirk off your face, you know what I mean.)

So, farewell, then, Eric Holder. Good riddance to bad rubbish. When you finally leave, that is.

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Ferguson is Just Another “Crisis” Obama Won’t Waste

Let him tell you:

I think Ferguson laid bare a problem that is not unique to St. Louis or that area, and is not unique to our time, and that is a simmering distrust that exists between too many police departments and too many communities of color. The sense that in a country where one of our basic principles, perhaps the most important principle, is equality under the law, that too many individuals, particularly young people of color, do not feel as if they are being treated fairly.

Are we dealing with facts or feelings here? Nothing factual about the incident between Michael Brown and Darren Wilson supports anything like this sort of talk. What facts prove that Brown was not treated fairly under the law? And if there is “simmering distrust”, aren’t both sides at fault? Why focus solely on the police? Did the police riot and loot?

But Eric Holder does Obama one better:

“This presents this nation with, I think, a unique opportunity,” Holder said. “And I think it’s incumbent on all of us to seize this opportunity to deal with issues that for too long have been ignored.”

Never let a crisis go to waste. Even if you’ve been in office for nearly six years, pretend like you just got to town. And for heaven’s sake, don’t define the crisis, or “issues”. The vaguer you are, the more you can get away with.

Holder further bloviated:

Like millions of Americans, I know many of you have spent the past few days with family members, friends, and loved ones, giving thanks for the blessings of the past year – but also mindful of recent news, the anguished emotions, and the images of destruction that have once again focused this country’s attention on Ferguson, Missouri.

Is this where he comes down hard on the rioters and looters, the professional agitators, the Panthers?

Not exactly:

Like you, I understand that the need for this trust was made clear in the wake of the intense public reaction to last week’s grand jury announcement. But the problems we must confront are not only found in Ferguson. The issues raised in Missouri are not unique to that state or that small city. We are dealing with concerns that are truly national in scope and that threaten the entire nation. Broadly speaking, without mutual understanding between citizens – whose rights must be respected – and law enforcement officers – who make tremendous and often-unheralded personal sacrifices every day to preserve public safety – there can be no meaningful progress. Our police officers cannot be seen as an occupying force disconnected from the communities they serve.

Responding to a convenience store robbery—in a black neighborhood—is occupation?

Move along, nothing to see.

But the issue is larger than just the police and the community. Our overall system of justice must be strengthened and made more fair.

That’s right, make a spurious point and then move on. To an even more spurious point.

[I]n the coming days, I will announce updated Justice Department guidance regarding profiling by federal law enforcement, which will institute rigorous new standards – and robust safeguards – to help end racial profiling, once and for all. This new guidance will codify our commitment to the very highest standards of fair and effective policing.

Again, he’s been Attorney General for nearly six years! If racial profiling is so bad, what’s he been doing all this time? Obama should sack him for indifference or incompetence.

But of course he won’t:

Eric Holder is going to be working in parallel with the task force to convene a series of these meetings all across the country, because this is not a problem simply of Ferguson, Missouri, this is a problem that is national. It is a solvable problem, but it is one that, unfortunately, spikes after one event and then fades into the background until something else happens. What we need is a sustained conversation…

We keep trying, but no one answers us.

Holder has already announced his resignation; I thought he couldn’t wait to get out of there. Now he’s point man on a nationwide initiative? What are these creeps up to?

But enough with the questions. You come here for answers.

This is all about politics. Obama is not playing to America. He’s playing to a subset of Americans with a gripe. We can argue about the validity of that gripe, but this is not how you “bring people together”. The vast majority of Americans think justice was done in Ferguson—until the rioting and looting started, that is. They look at the mayhem in Ferguson, they listen to Obama and Holder, and the two do not match. Neither do the vast majority of Americans support amnesty for illegal aliens. But with the same self-righteous pontificating, Obama assured us he was acting unilaterally (and illegally) out of fairness.

It took some doing, but Obama has lost the middle-class white vote for Democrats. But that’s okay because he’s leaving them with a new coalition. Latinos legalized by an invalid diktat, and African Americans united by a fiction (“hands up, don’t shoot”), plus the usual collection of kooks, cranks, and Kool-Aid drinkers that remain loyal to the Party—these ain’t your daddy’s Democrats. But they’re Liz Warren’s. The Class Warfare will commence shortly.

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Inside Eric Holder’s Mind

Here, put on this level-4 hazmat suit. Wouldn’t want to get any of this on you:

The email chain begins with then-Associate Deputy Attorney General Matthew Axelrod explaining that Issa’s planned to subpoena a witness to testify on the scandal.

“This keeps escalating,” Gary Grindler, a DOJ official at the time, wrote.

Holder then issued his response:

Ok. We have to be careful. His decision has to truly be his. If he testifies so be it.

Issa and his idiot cronies never gave a damn about this when all that was happening was that thousands of Mexicans were being killed with guns from our country. All they want to do- in reality- is cripple ATF and suck up to the gun lobby. Politics at its worst- maybe the media will get it.

This was part of the Encyclopedia Britannica document dump on Election Day. As Issa tweeted, the dump was eight times the total number of documents released in the three-plus years Issa has been investigating. Holder’s on his way out now, so what does he care?

To me, the most offensive words were “we have to be careful”. Mexicans were being killed by guns he ran, as well as one American, border agent, Brian Terry. And Holder’s reaction was to “be careful”. As in cover up.

Immature, I admit, but I want to do a document dump all over him, minus the documents.

PS: “Cripple the ATF”? The Fast and Furious investigation was instigated by ATF whistleblowers. Who ere punished for their truth-telling.

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Bring Me the Hard Drive of Sharyl Attkisson

As Barack “Tony Montana” Obama says: You f*ck with me, you f*ckin’ with the best!

From the moment that Sharyl Attkisson met a shadowy source I’ll call Big Mac, she was plunged into a nightmare involving mysterious surveillance of her computers.

They met at a McDonald’s in Northern Virginia at the beginning of 2013, and the source (she dubs him Number One) warned her about the threat of government spying. During their next hamburger rendezvous, Big Mac told Attkisson, then a CBS News reporter constantly at odds with the Obama administration, that he was “shocked” and “flabbergasted” by his examination of her computer and that this was “worse than anything Nixon ever did.”

Just when you think Attkisson’s imagination might be running away with her comes wave after wave of evidence that both her CBS computer and personal iMac were repeatedly hacked and its files accessed, including one on Benghazi. A consultant hired by CBS reached the same conclusion. Further scrutiny of her personal desktop proves that “the interlopers were able to co-opt my iMac and operate it remotely, as if they were sitting in front of it.” And an inspection revealed that an extra fiber-optics line had been installed in Attkisson’s home without her knowledge.

This is chilling stuff.

There is the strong implication that an administration that spied on the Associated Press and Fox News correspondent James Rosen might have been involved.

You take that back! Just because they spied on a Fox News reporter, locked other reporters in broom closets, earned the contempt of the White House press corps for their secrecy (“more dangerous to the press, really, than any administration in American history”), and sicced the IRS on American citizens, doesn’t mean they’re bad people.

Oh wait:

Last month whistleblower and retired ATF Agent Jay Dobyns won a long court battle against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms after the agency retaliated against him for warning about corruption in management and failed to address death threats against his family.

Dobyns, who infiltrated the dangerous and deadly Hells Angels gang as an undercover agent years ago, brought a lawsuit against the Bureau after supervisors ignored death threats to his family, which included plans to murder him either with a bullet or by injecting him with the AIDS virus, kidnapping and torturing his then 15-year-old daughter and kidnapping his wife in order to videotape a gang rape of her. Contracts were solicited between the Hells Angels, the Aryan Brotherhood and the MS-13 gang to carry out these threats, which were laid out in prison letters and confirmed through FBI and ATF interviews of confidential informants inside numerous detention centers. In 2008, his Tucson home was burned to the ground. When the fire was started, his wife and children were inside. Luckily, they escaped. Instead of investigating, ATF supervisors accused Dobyns of being the arsonist.

In his opinion, U.S. Court of Federal Claims Judge Francis Allegra described ATF officials as demonstrating misfeasance in the case “rooted in the sorry failure of some ATF officials.” Dobyns was awarded $173,000, an insufficient amount considering his family has been nearly bankrupted as a result of ATF’s behavior, not to mention the emotional stress incurred throughout the process.

Now unsatisfied with a loss in court and berating by a federal judge, ATF and the Department of Justice are appealing the ruling.

The decision to appeal no doubt is the continuation of retaliation from the Bureau against Dobyns, proving that nothing has changed since Acting ATF Director B. Todd Jones promised to cleanup the agency.

Oh, he promised! Did he say “if you like your civil liberties, you can keep your civil liberties, period”?

Anyhow, what good is a promise when your boss is the the consigliere of the crime family, Eric Holder?

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Lo-o-o-ving You-u-u is Easy Cause You’re Criminal

It took some doing, but the media found someone sorry to see Eric (the Red) Holder go:

Eric Holder Transformed the Attorney General into an Advocate for the Poor

By Angela J. Davis

On September 25, Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation. He made history as the nation’s first African American attorney general and will most likely be remembered for his vigorous enforcement of the nation’s civil rights laws. He deserves equal accolades for his leadership in working to reform the nation’s broken criminal justice system. Since his appointment as attorney general, he has consistently criticized the draconian federal sentencing laws that require lengthy mandatory minimum sentences in nonviolent drug cases and has decried the unwarranted racial disparities in the criminal justice system, calling the phenomenon “a civil rights issue … that I’m determined to confront as long as I’m attorney general.” And he certainly kept that promise.

Before becoming the nation’s top law enforcement officer, there was no indication that Eric Holder would ultimately become an advocate for poor people incarcerated in our nation’s prisons and jails. After all, Eric Holder spent most of his professional career as a criminal prosecutor. He started out as a prosecutor in the Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section where for 12 years he worked to put away corrupt public officials. During his five years as a judge in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, he earned a reputation as a tough sentencer, locking up countless young African American men for long periods of time.

I have no comment on that. Maybe they were guilty.

But one person’s “advocate for the poor” is another person’s partisan political hatchet man. Alas, this is not the Angela Davis you might have been thinking of, and fairness in sentencing is an admirable cause. But it’s disingenuous to ignore all Holder did (and did not do) in defense of this most corrupt regime.

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CORRECTION

Yesterday, we implied that Fast & Furious (2010) was the Obama regime’s first “smidgen of corruption”.

Shame on us:

The very first controversy of the Eric Holder-led Justice Department (“DOJ”) involved the dismissal of the voter-intimidation lawsuit against the New Black Panther Party (“NBPP”). The matter provided a template for most of the DOJ controversies that followed: denial, stonewalling, obfuscation, deceit, and racialism.

The U.S.Commission on Civil Rights conducted a year-long investigation into the matter shortly after the dismissal. Despite being compelled by statute to cooperate fully with commission investigations, DOJ

refused to answer 18 separate interrogatories,

refused to respond to 22 separate requests for production of documents,

barred two key DOJ attorneys from testifying (both of the attorneys defied DOJ and testified at considerable risk to their careers),

refused to provide witness statements for twelve key witnesses,

invoked specious privileges in order to withhold critical information,

failed to provide a privilege log,

and failed to provide requested e-mails between Civil Rights Division personnel and other DOJ officials regarding the dismissal of the NBPP lawsuit (some of the e-mails later were revealed pursuant to court order in a lawsuit brought by Judicial Watch)

Despite the vigorous stonewalling, DOJ publicly claimed that it was cooperating fully with the investigation. The claim was blatantly false, but was cheerfully reported by the media. What most of the mainstream media failed to report, however, was that the bipartisan commission’s investigation adduced testimony that

A high-ranking DOJ political appointee gave instructions that the Voting Section was not going to bring cases “against black defendants or for the benefit of white victims.”

A high-ranking DOJ political appointee explicitly told the entire Voting Section “that this administration would not be enforcing Section 8 of the National Voter Registration Act.” (The purpose of section 8 of the NVRA is to ensure that persons ineligible to vote are not permitted to vote.)

DOJ refuses to enforce Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act on behalf of white victims.

There exists within DOJ pervasive hostility to the race-neutral enforcement of civil-rights laws.

Furthermore, a high-ranking DOJ political appointee testified under oath that no political leadership was involved in the decision to dismiss the NBPP lawsuit. The testimony was shown to be false only after the Judicial Watch lawsuit pried loose e-mails showing clear political involvement.

The commission’s 262-page report to congress contains much more evidence that, under Holder, DOJ did not enforce the nation’s civil-rights laws in a color-blind manner. Something to consider while reading the next obtuse editorial extolling Mr. Holder’s record on civil rights.

Strong words, Eric (the Red). What have you to say for yourself?

“When you compare what people endured in the South in the 60s to try to get the right to vote for African Americans, and to compare what people were subjected to there to what happened in Philadelphia—which was inappropriate, certainly that…to describe it in those terms I think does a great disservice to people who put their lives on the line, who risked all, for my people,” said Holder, who is black.

Your people, Americans, were met with real, obvious, and documented voter intimidation. And you let it go.

In the absence of any explanation, we are left to surmise. Were the Panthers your “shock troops”, your “boots on the ground”?

He’s not too fond of “typical white people” either. Or atypical ones.

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